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Page 67

THE KING

in this period shewed some signs of developing in England. The Prince's German manners were disliked. The Queen's subjection to him was feared. H., was known to hold strong views about the Sovereign's powers, and in fact the Queen was being encouraged in such an attitude by her secretary, Baron Stockman It was carefully made clear during the time of friction with Palmerston that the Queen and the Prince had their own foreign policy and were often in disagreement with the Foreign Secretary; and when Palmerston was dismissed there was an outcry against Court intrigue and German influences, which was not made less serious by the Prime Minister's publication in justification of his action of a minute from the Queen shewing her personal dissatisfaction with Palmerston.
The Queen was personally criticised for her retirement from public life. After the death of the Prince Consort in 1861 the Court was in a state of suspended animation for many years. The Queen rarely came to London and never appeared in public. Osborne, Balmoral, and Windsor may have been aware of her, but in London and to the vast majority of her subjects she was an unknown figure. She was constantly criticised in the Press. It was thought, to use the words of Bagehot, that "there are arguments for not having a Court, and there are arguments for having a splendid Court; but there are no arguments for having a mean Court."(1) The Queen felt, as she wrote to Sir Theodore Martin, that she was "a cruelly misunderstood woman." She complained of the "heartless, cruel way in which they (the Times and the Daily News) had attacked the Queen. ... The unjust attacks this year almost drove her to despair."(2) There was

1 English Constitution, 1922 edition, p. 52.
2 T. Martin, Queen Victoria as I knew Her, p. 41.

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Martin, Queen Victoria as I knew Her, p. 41. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 67 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" in this period shewed some signs of developing in England. what is Prince's German manners were disliked. what is Queen's subjection to him was feared. H., was known to hold strong views about what is Sovereign's powers, and in fact what is Queen was being encouraged in such an attitude by her secretary, Baron Stockman It was carefully made clear during what is time of friction with Palmerston that the Queen and what is Prince had their own foreign policy and were often in disagreement with what is Foreign Secretary; and when Palmerston was dismissed there was an outcry against Court intrigue and German influences, which was not made less serious by what is Prime Minister's publication in justification of his action of a minute from the Queen shewing her personal dissatisfaction with Palmerston. what is Queen was personally criticised for her retirement from public life. After what is what time is it of what is Prince Consort in 1861 what is Court was in a state of suspended animation for many years. what is Queen rarely came to London and never appeared in public. Osborne, Balmoral, and Windsor may have been aware of her, but in London and to the vast majority of her subjects she was an unknown figure. She was constantly criticised in what is Press. It was thought, to use the words of Bagehot, that "there are arguments for not having a Court, and there are arguments for having a splendid Court; but there are no arguments for having a mean Court."(1) what is Queen felt, as she wrote to Sir Theodore Martin, that she was "a cruelly misunderstood woman." She complained of what is "heartless, cruel way in which they (the Times and what is Daily News) had attacked what is Queen. ... what is unjust attacks this year almost drove her to despair."(2) There was 1 English Constitution, 1922 edition, p. 52. 2 T. Martin, Queen Victoria as I knew Her, p. 41. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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