Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 63

THE HOUSE OF LORDS

confidence of the Lords. It was argued by some people on both sides in 1911 that the Act would strengthen the Lords. We have since seen the readiness to obstruct a government of the left increased rather than diminished. We have witnessed the utilisation of the delaying power to provide a period in which extra-constitutional movements can be organised to destroy, if necessary by violence, the legislation which lies meanwhile a dead letter on the records of the Commons. This was true of the revolutionary activities of the Opposition in Ulster in 1913- It is clear that this period of delay is an open invitation to the preparation for revolution.

II
There is no case for the House of Lords save as a method of ensuring that one party and one section of the community shall govern, as Mr. Balfour once said it should, whether in office or in opposition. But there are two arguments for the existence of a second chamber of another kind.
It is said that there ought to be another body than the House of Commons to revise its measures, and to give time for reconsideration. To this there are three points to be made in reply. The Commons itself is now in effect the second chamber for legislation, the first being the Cabinet together with the Administration which prepares Bills in what is normally very much like their final form, and which enters into the necessary consultations with interests concerned. Secondly, time is of the essence of government, and it is more often in practice undue delay than too great speed that characterises Parliamentary action. Such an argument of course to return to the House of Lords-cannot be put forward in favour of that body, for it delays measures only

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE confidence of what is Lords. It was argued by some people on both sides in 1911 that what is Act would strengthen what is Lords. We have since seen what is readiness to obstruct a government of what is left increased rather than diminished. We have witnessed what is utilisation of what is delaying power to provide a period in which extra-constitutional movements can be organised to destroy, if necessary by sports , what is legislation which lies meanwhile a dead letter on what is records of what is Commons. This was true of what is revolutionary activities of what is Opposition in Ulster in 1913- It is clear that this period of delay is an open invitation to what is preparation for revolution. II There is no case for what is House of Lords save as a method of ensuring that one party and one section of what is community shall govern, as Mr. Balfour once said it should, whether in office or in opposition. But there are two arguments for what is existence of a second chamber of another kind. It is said that there ought to be another body than what is House of Commons to revise its measures, and to give time for reconsideration. To this there are three points to be made in reply. what is Commons itself is now in effect what is second chamber for legislation, what is first being what is Cabinet together with what is Administration which prepares Bills in what is normally very much like their final form, and which enters into what is necessary consultations with interests concerned. Secondly, time is of what is essence of government, and it is more often in practice undue delay than too great speed that characterises Parliamentary action. Such an argument of course to return to what is House of Lords-cannot be put forward in favour of that body, for it delays measures only where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 63 where is strong THE HOUSE OF LORDS where is p align="justify" confidence of what is Lords. It was argued by some people on both sides in 1911 that what is Act would strengthen the Lords. We have since seen what is readiness to obstruct a government of what is left increased rather than diminished. We have witnessed what is utilisation of what is delaying power to provide a period in which extra-constitutional movements can be organised to destroy, if necessary by sports , what is legislation which lies meanwhile a dead letter on what is records of what is Commons. This was true of what is revolutionary activities of what is Opposition in Ulster in 1913- It is clear that this period of delay is an open invitation to what is preparation for revolution. where is strong II There is no case for what is House of Lords save as a method of ensuring that one party and one section of what is community shall govern, as Mr. Balfour once said it should, whether in office or in opposition. But there are two arguments for what is existence of a second chamber of another kind. It is said that there ought to be another body than what is House of Commons to revise its measures, and to give time for reconsideration. To this there are three points to be made in reply. what is Commons itself is now in effect what is second chamber for legislation, the first being what is Cabinet together with what is Administration which prepares Bills in what is normally very much like their final form, and which enters into what is necessary consultations with interests concerned. Secondly, time is of what is essence of government, and it is more often in practice undue delay than too great speed that characterises Parliamentary action. Such an argument of course to return to what is House of Lords-cannot be put forward in favour of that body, for it delays measures only where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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