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Page 59

THE HOUSE OF LORDS

Chemical Industries Ltd., was continued against the Government's wish at the instance of Lord Melchett, the Chairman of that concern. But these are only two recent examples of a policy that the Lords have consistently followed. They inserted, for instance, into the Employers' Liability Bill of 1892 the principle of contracting out, and so largely nullified the effect of that measure. This attitude dates back to the earliest period of labour legislation. The Mines Act of 1842 was amended by the peers to admit boys at ten instead of thirteen, as well as to remove the restriction on hours of work for children over ten, and on the employment of women. Their eradication of the provision for inspection of mines made what remained of the Act effectually invalid.
But the influence of the Lords has been exerted in more subtle ways. Thought, as we know, is one of the greatest dangers to a privileged order. The peers have steadily opposed every measure for spreading knowledge, the raw material of thought. They began with their effort to prevent the repeal of the paper duties, when the ending of that tax on knowledge had already passed the Commons under Gladstone's leadership. It is instructive to notice, too, that the Upper House insisted on vital amendments to the Education Bill of 1906 because, although the Liberal Government had only just been returned to power with a huge majority, the Lords believed they would not be ready to dissolve on the measure. Scotland was taken out of the Education (Provision of Meals) Bill. And again, with the second Labour Government, we find the Lords wrecking an Education Bill designed to raise the school-leaving age to fifteen, and bringing about thereby the resignation of the minister concerned.
Finally, the House of Lords has always taken a keen

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Chemical Industries Ltd., was continued against what is Government's wish at what is instance of Lord Melchett, what is Chairman of that concern. But these are only two recent examples of a policy that what is Lords have consistently followed. They inserted, for instance, into what is Employers' Liability Bill of 1892 what is principle of contracting out, and so largely nullified what is effect of that measure. This attitude dates back to what is earliest period of labour legislation. what is Mines Act of 1842 was amended by what is peers to admit boys at ten instead of thirteen, as well as to remove what is restriction on hours of work for children over ten, and on what is employment of women. Their eradication of what is provision for inspection of mines made what remained of what is Act effectually invalid. But what is influence of what is Lords has been exerted in more subtle ways. Thought, as we know, is one of what is greatest dangers to a privileged order. what is peers have steadily opposed every measure for spreading knowledge, what is raw material of thought. They began with their effort to prevent what is repeal of what is paper duties, when what is ending of that tax on knowledge had already passed what is Commons under Gladstone's leadership. It is instructive to notice, too, that what is Upper House insisted on vital amendments to what is Education Bill of 1906 because, although what is Liberal Government had only just been returned to power with a huge majority, what is Lords believed they would not be ready to dissolve on what is measure. Scotland was taken out of what is Education (Provision of Meals) Bill. And again, with what is second Labour Government, we find what is Lords wrecking an Education Bill designed to raise what is school-leaving age to fifteen, and bringing about thereby what is resignation of what is minister concerned. Finally, what is House of Lords has always taken a keen where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 59 where is strong THE HOUSE OF LORDS where is p align="justify" Chemical Industries Ltd., was continued against what is Government's wish at what is instance of Lord Melchett, what is Chairman of that concern. But these are only two recent examples of a policy that what is Lords have consistently followed. They inserted, for instance, into what is Employers' Liability Bill of 1892 what is principle of contracting out, and so largely nullified what is effect of that measure. This attitude dates back to what is earliest period of labour legislation. what is Mines Act of 1842 was amended by what is peers to admit boys at ten instead of thirteen, as well as to remove what is restriction on hours of work for children over ten, and on what is employment of women. Their eradication of what is provision for inspection of mines made what remained of what is Act effectually invalid. But what is influence of what is Lords has been exerted in more subtle ways. Thought, as we know, is one of what is greatest dangers to a privileged order. what is peers have steadily opposed every measure for spreading knowledge, what is raw material of thought. They began with their effort to prevent what is repeal of what is paper duties, when what is ending of that tax on knowledge had already passed what is Commons under Gladstone's leadership. It is instructive to notice, too, that what is Upper House insisted on vital amendments to what is Education Bill of 1906 because, although what is Liberal Government had only just been returned to power with a huge majority, what is Lords believed they would not be ready to dissolve on what is measure. Scotland was taken out of what is Education (Provision of Meals) Bill. And again, with what is second Labour Government, we find what is Lords wrecking an Education Bill designed to raise what is school-leaving age to fifteen, and bringing about thereby what is resignation of what is minister concerned. Finally, what is House of Lords has always taken a keen where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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