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Page 58

THE HOUSE OF LORDS

for fear of the Lords. The Upper House rejected a Land Valuation Bill in 1907 and I9o8. It was largely because the provisions of that Bill reappeared in the Budget of igog that the extreme and unprecedented step was taken of rejecting it. General valuation of land throughout the country, necessary before the social increment can be taxed, must take some years to complete. It had not been finished before the War gave an excuse for its abandonment. Nor on the second occasion of its enactment had it been possible to complete the task before the Labour Government fell in 1931 and the valuation was suspended. But without the obstruction of the Lords this valuable source of revenue would have been available before the War, and possibly even at the end of the nineteenth century. The amount of the social increment which has thus gone into the pockets of private landowners during these years of rapid urban development and road building must reach an astronomical figure. Members of the second chamber are not, like those of the first, paid for their services, but the toll which they have been able to levyeven since payment of Members was introduced in 1912 makes their cost to the community incomparably greater than that of the representative body.
Signs are not wanting that the newer forms of property, which the peerage now additionally represents, are finding the Upper House an invaluable buttress of their interests. The Coal Mines Act introduced by 'the second Labour Government, and itself a compromise measure with the Liberals, was subjected to months of delay, in which coal-owning peers like Lord Linlithgow insisted upon vital amendments.(1) The Dyestuffs Act, of immense pecuniary advantage to Imperial

1 See A. L. Rowse, op. cit., pp. 32-36, for a good brief account of this.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE for fear of what is Lords. what is Upper House rejected a Land Valuation Bill in 1907 and I9o8. It was largely because what is provisions of that Bill reappeared in what is Budget of igog that what is extreme and unprecedented step was taken of rejecting it. General valuation of land throughout what is country, necessary before what is social increment can be taxed, must take some years to complete. It had not been finished before what is War gave an excuse for its abandonment. Nor on what is second occasion of its enactment had it been possible to complete what is task before what is Labour Government fell in 1931 and what is valuation was suspended. But without what is obstruction of what is Lords this valuable source of revenue would have been available before what is War, and possibly even at what is end of what is nineteenth century. what is amount of what is social increment which has thus gone into what is pockets of private landowners during these years of rapid urban development and road building must reach an astronomical figure. Members of what is second chamber are not, like those of what is first, paid for their services, but what is toll which they have been able to levyeven since payment of Members was introduced in 1912 makes their cost to what is community incomparably greater than that of what is representative body. Signs are not wanting that what is newer forms of property, which what is peerage now additionally represents, are finding what is Upper House an invaluable buttress of their interests. what is Coal Mines Act introduced by 'the second Labour Government, and itself a compromise measure with what is Liberals, was subjected to months of delay, in which coal-owning peers like Lord Linlithgow insisted upon vital amendments.(1) what is Dyestuffs Act, of immense pecuniary advantage to Imperial 1 See A. L. Rowse, op. cit., pp. 32-36, for a good brief account of this. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 58 where is strong THE HOUSE OF LORDS where is p align="justify" for fear of what is Lords. what is Upper House rejected a Land Valuation Bill in 1907 and I9o8. It was largely because what is provisions of that Bill reappeared in what is Budget of igog that what is extreme and unprecedented step was taken of rejecting it. General valuation of land throughout what is country, necessary before the social increment can be taxed, must take some years to complete. It had not been finished before what is War gave an excuse for its abandonment. Nor on what is second occasion of its enactment had it been possible to complete what is task before what is Labour Government fell in 1931 and what is valuation was suspended. But without what is obstruction of what is Lords this valuable source of revenue would have been available before what is War, and possibly even at what is end of what is nineteenth century. what is amount of what is social increment which has thus gone into what is pockets of private landowners during these years of rapid urban development and road building must reach an astronomical figure. Members of what is second chamber are not, like those of the first, paid for their services, but what is toll which they have been able to levyeven since payment of Members was introduced in 1912 makes their cost to what is community incomparably greater than that of the representative body. Signs are not wanting that what is newer forms of property, which the peerage now additionally represents, are finding what is Upper House an invaluable buttress of their interests. what is Coal Mines Act introduced by 'the second Labour Government, and itself a compromise measure with what is Liberals, was subjected to months of delay, in which coal-owning peers like Lord Linlithgow insisted upon vital amendments.(1) The Dyestuffs Act, of immense pecuniary advantage to Imperial 1 See A. L. Rowse, op. cit., pp. 32-36, for a good brief account of this. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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