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Page 55

THE HOUSE OF LORDS

of "considered judgment." Bills are discussed on their merits as seen by the members of that House. They are accepted, amended or rejected simply on an evaluation of their merits, and in the process of that evaluation the main question is how they will affect the "important interests" represented. It is true that certain Bills disapproved by the House have nevertheless been accepted on the argument that there is a strong majority of the electorate behind them; but they have been accepted only out of the knowledge that an ensuing conflict with the Government and the Commons would be on unfavourable ground, and therefore dangerous to the most important of all the interests of the House, its own preservation.
John Stuart Mill once described the House of Lords as a very irritating kind of minor nuisance. There can be no doubt that he expressed the view prevalent among Liberals and even among Radicals at a time before the Upper House had developed its full technique of obstruction. It is true that the Lords had brought the country to the verge of revolution in 1832, and a power which could do this could hardly be regarded as of minor importance. But the party of reform had triumphed in the end, and this seemed to have established a precedent of a significance which could only be enhanced by the accession of authority coming to the Commons through their greater representativeness. Besides, for ten years after the reform, the Lords were led by the Duke of Wellington along a path of compromise. That elder statesman, who belonged to the old order, recognised the ultimate superiority of the Commons which had been established in the eighteenth century. What was not seen at this time was that the new difference in origin of the two Houses would inevitably make the second chamber

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of "considered judgment." Bills are discussed on their merits as seen by what is members of that House. They are accepted, amended or rejected simply on an evaluation of their merits, and in what is process of that evaluation what is main question is how they will affect what is "important interests" represented. It is true that certain Bills disapproved by what is House have nevertheless been accepted on what is argument that there is a strong majority of what is electorate behind them; but they have been accepted only out of what is knowledge that an ensuing conflict with what is Government and what is Commons would be on unfavourable ground, and therefore dangerous to what is most important of all what is interests of what is House, its own preservation. John Stuart Mill once described what is House of Lords as a very irritating kind of minor nuisance. There can be no doubt that he expressed what is view prevalent among Liberals and even among Radicals at a time before what is Upper House had developed its full technique of obstruction. It is true that what is Lords had brought what is country to what is verge of revolution in 1832, and a power which could do this could hardly be regarded as of minor importance. But what is party of reform had triumphed in what is end, and this seemed to have established a precedent of a significance which could only be enhanced by what is accession of authority coming to what is Commons through their greater representativeness. Besides, for ten years after what is reform, what is Lords were led by what is Duke of Wellington along a path of compromise. That elder statesman, who belonged to what is old order, recognised what is ultimate superiority of what is Commons which had been established in what is eighteenth century. What was not seen at this time was that what is new difference in origin of what is two Houses would inevitably make what is second chamber where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 55 where is strong THE HOUSE OF LORDS where is p align="justify" of "considered judgment." Bills are discussed on their merits as seen by what is members of that House. They are accepted, amended or rejected simply on an evaluation of their merits, and in what is process of that evaluation what is main question is how they will affect what is "important interests" represented. It is true that certain Bills disapproved by what is House have nevertheless been accepted on what is argument that there is a strong majority of what is electorate behind them; but they have been accepted only out of what is knowledge that an ensuing conflict with what is Government and what is Commons would be on unfavourable ground, and therefore dangerous to what is most important of all what is interests of what is House, its own preservation. John Stuart Mill once described what is House of Lords as a very irritating kind of minor nuisance. There can be no doubt that he expressed what is view prevalent among Liberals and even among Radicals at a time before what is Upper House had developed its full technique of obstruction. It is true that what is Lords had brought what is country to what is verge of revolution in 1832, and a power which could do this could hardly be regarded as of minor importance. But what is party of reform had triumphed in what is end, and this seemed to have established a precedent of a significance which could only be enhanced by the accession of authority coming to what is Commons through their greater representativeness. Besides, for ten years after what is reform, the Lords were led by what is Duke of Wellington along a path of compromise. That elder statesman, who belonged to what is old order, recognised what is ultimate superiority of what is Commons which had been established in what is eighteenth century. What was not seen at this time was that what is new difference in origin of what is two Houses would inevitably make what is second chamber where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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