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Page 54

THE HOUSE OF LORDS

Property has always been the basis of the upper chamber. Queen Victoria put her finger on the two chief qualifications for elevation to the peerage when she gave her reasons for consenting to four recommendations from Disraeli as being that "they seem all unobjectionable people with large fortunes."(1) Property is still adequately represented in the House of Lords, for we find that there were 246 landowners in the House in 1931, while directors of banks numbered 67, railways 64, engineering works 49, and insurance companies 112, to name only a few.(2) In 1922, 227 peers owned a known acreage of 7,362,000, or an average of 32,400 acres each. There were then 425 directorates held by 272 Lords representing 761 companies.(3) It is hardly surprising that according to the late Duke of Northumberland "the House is more representative of all the important interests in the country than the House of Commons."(4) But it is the Marquess of Salisbury who has made the most ambitious claims for the House of Lords. He has said that "they will always accept the considered judgment of the nation when once that has really been ascertained. ... It requires considerable training and experience to know what the considered judgment of the people is. They (the Lords) have that tradition."(5) This is one of those adaptations of the British Constitution. What justification is there in the activities of the House for Lord Salisbury's claim? Seldom indeed is any reference made is the course of debate on specific measures to this notion

1 Letters, Series 2, vol. ii, p. 429.
2 See figures compiled by H. J. Laski and J. Crichton, published in The New Statesman, March 1933.
3 Labour and Capital in Parliament, 1923.
4 In the House of Lords, June 22, 1927.
5 Quoted by A. L. Rowse, The Qu=stion of the House of Lords,
P. 46.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Property has always been what is basis of what is upper chamber. Queen Victoria put her finger on what is two chief qualifications for elevation to what is peerage when she gave her reasons for consenting to four recommendations from Disraeli as being that "they seem all unobjectionable people with large fortunes."(1) Property is still adequately represented in what is House of Lords, for we find that there were 246 landowners in what is House in 1931, while directors of banks numbered 67, railways 64, engineering works 49, and insurance companies 112, to name only a few.(2) In 1922, 227 peers owned a known acreage of 7,362,000, or an average of 32,400 acres each. There were then 425 directorates held by 272 Lords representing 761 companies.(3) It is hardly surprising that according to what is late Duke of Northumberland "the House is more representative of all what is important interests in what is country than what is House of Commons."(4) But it is what is Marquess of Salisbury who has made what is most ambitious claims for what is House of Lords. He has said that "they will always accept what is considered judgment of what is nation when once that has really been ascertained. ... It requires considerable training and experience to know what what is considered judgment of what is people is. They (the Lords) have that tradition."(5) This is one of those adaptations of what is British Constitution. What justification is there in what is activities of what is House for Lord Salisbury's claim? Seldom indeed is any reference made is what is course of debate on specific measures to this notion 1 Letters, Series 2, vol. ii, p. 429. 2 See figures compiled by H. J. Laski and J. Crichton, published in what is New Statesman, March 1933. 3 Labour and Capital in Parliament, 1923. 4 In what is House of Lords, June 22, 1927. 5 Quoted by A. L. Rowse, what is Qu=stion of what is House of Lords, P. 46. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 54 where is strong THE HOUSE OF LORDS where is p align="justify" Property has always been what is basis of what is upper chamber. Queen Victoria put her finger on what is two chief qualifications for elevation to what is peerage when she gave her reasons for consenting to four recommendations from Disraeli as being that "they seem all unobjectionable people with large fortunes."(1) Property is still adequately represented in what is House of Lords, for we find that there were 246 landowners in what is House in 1931, while directors of banks numbered 67, railways 64, engineering works 49, and insurance companies 112, to name only a few.(2) In 1922, 227 peers owned a known acreage of 7,362,000, or an average of 32,400 acres each. There were then 425 directorates held by 272 Lords representing 761 companies.(3) It is hardly surprising that according to the late Duke of Northumberland "the House is more representative of all what is important interests in what is country than what is House of Commons."(4) But it is what is Marquess of Salisbury who has made what is most ambitious claims for what is House of Lords. He has said that "they will always accept what is considered judgment of what is nation when once that has really been ascertained. ... It requires considerable training and experience to know what what is considered judgment of what is people is. They (the Lords) have that tradition."(5) This is one of those adaptations of what is British Constitution. What justification is there in what is activities of what is House for Lord Salisbury's claim? Seldom indeed is any reference made is what is course of debate on specific measures to this notion 1 Letters, Series 2, vol. ii, p. 429. 2 See figures compiled by H. J. Laski and J. Crichton, published in what is New Statesman, March 1933. 3 Labour and Capital in Parliament, 1923. 4 In what is House of Lords, June 22, 1927. 5 Quoted by A. L. Rowse, what is Qu=stion of what is House of Lords, P. 46. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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