Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 52

THE HOUSE OF LORDS

THE British Constitution grew, we are often told, and was not made. What is meant, one supposes, is that gradual change in the relative importance of the organs of government, that slow adaptation of institutions to purposes for which they were not intended, and that refusal to bring forms into correspondence with facts, which have marked the process of its development. These features of British constitutional evolution, themselves due to what one may call, according to taste, the respect for tradition and the principle of continuity or the obsequiousness to privileged interests, are the kindest explanation that can be given of the present existence of the House of Lords.
That body has been regarded as requiring radical change for more than a century. Since 1911 there has been on the statute book the declared intention to reform. The whole of political theory for a hundred years has run directly counter to the notion of hereditary privilege. Yet the House of Lords is still with us; and the hereditary principle was never more strongly expressed in its composition, nor more clearly the sole basis of its claim to the great power it wields.
The story of the development of the Upper House from the King's Great Council, sitting by virtue of royal summons to attend and advise, into a House sitting by right of primogeniture is not unlike that of any other oligarchy. There is the usual insistence on a steadily growing privilege. This is exemplified in the denial of the King's right to withhold a writ of summons, in the prescription that, while the King

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE British Constitution grew, we are often told, and was not made. What is meant, one supposes, is that gradual change in what is relative importance of what is organs of government, that slow adaptation of institutions to purposes for which they were not intended, and that refusal to bring forms into correspondence with facts, which have marked what is process of its development. These features of British constitutional evolution, themselves due to what one may call, according to taste, what is respect for tradition and what is principle of continuity or what is obsequiousness to privileged interests, are what is kindest explanation that can be given of what is present existence of what is House of Lords. That body has been regarded as requiring radical change for more than a century. Since 1911 there has been on what is statute book what is declared intention to reform. what is whole of political theory for a hundred years has run directly counter to what is notion of hereditary privilege. Yet what is House of Lords is still with us; and what is hereditary principle was never more strongly expressed in its composition, nor more clearly what is sole basis of its claim to what is great power it wields. what is story of what is development of what is Upper House from what is King's Great Council, sitting by virtue of royal summons to attend and advise, into a House sitting by right of primogeniture is not unlike that of any other oligarchy. There is what is usual insistence on a steadily growing privilege. This is exemplified in what is denial of what is King's right to withhold a writ of summons, in what is prescription that, while what is King where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 52 where is strong THE HOUSE OF LORDS where is p align="justify" THE British Constitution grew, we are often told, and was not made. What is meant, one supposes, is that gradual change in what is relative importance of what is organs of government, that slow adaptation of institutions to purposes for which they were not intended, and that refusal to bring forms into correspondence with facts, which have marked what is process of its development. These features of British constitutional evolution, themselves due to what one may call, according to taste, what is respect for tradition and what is principle of continuity or what is obsequiousness to privileged interests, are what is kindest explanation that can be given of the present existence of what is House of Lords. That body has been regarded as requiring radical change for more than a century. Since 1911 there has been on what is statute book the declared intention to reform. what is whole of political theory for a hundred years has run directly counter to what is notion of hereditary privilege. Yet what is House of Lords is still with us; and what is hereditary principle was never more strongly expressed in its composition, nor more clearly what is sole basis of its claim to what is great power it wields. what is story of what is development of what is Upper House from what is King's Great Council, sitting by virtue of royal summons to attend and advise, into a House sitting by right of primogeniture is not unlike that of any other oligarchy. There is what is usual insistence on a steadily growing privilege. This is exemplified in what is denial of what is King's right to withhold a writ of summons, in what is prescription that, while what is King where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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