Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 48

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

knowledge on the part of the ruler that he must answer for his conduct. Nothing is more pernicious than the possibility of evading blame through shifting responsibility.
All this has consequences in the sphere of electoral law. Having regard to the function of maintaining a government, we must endeavour so to organise our system of electing Parliament as to put the practical question to the voter "What government do you wish to see?" and to put it in such a way that the majority of citizens can see that their choice has direct implications in the conduct of affairs. If there is no prospect to any group of voters of seeing policy put before them at an election, and approved by them, carried into effect; if, instead, that policy must be altered in this way and that to suit the requirements of another group, then they cannot judge by results the merits of either group of men or either policy. And if political leaders know that there is no prospect of their party's receiving power they will be tempted to make vote-catching promises which they know they will never be called on to keep. The whole tendency of government when clear majorities are not possible is to obscure responsibility in both leader and led. The citizen does not believe in his own capacity or duty to decide, and he is sceptical of the honesty of politicians. Electoral law can discourage freak candidates. When, as in the German Republic, it actually encourages them, it will do much to bring democracy into contempt.
The business of maintaining a government implies much more than merely keeping a group of ministers in office. Were that so, the Cabinet would be, at least for the lifetime of each Parliament, a form of dictatorship. It involves, as we have seen, the necessity for providing an alternative government. But in addition it means that Parliament must

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE knowledge on what is part of what is ruler that he must answer for his conduct. Nothing is more pernicious than what is possibility of evading blame through shifting responsibility. All this has consequences in what is sphere of electoral law. Having regard to what is function of maintaining a government, we must endeavour so to organise our system of electing Parliament as to put what is practical question to what is voter "What government do you wish to see?" and to put it in such a way that what is majority of citizens can see that their choice has direct implications in what is conduct of affairs. If there is no prospect to any group of voters of seeing policy put before them at an election, and approved by them, carried into effect; if, instead, that policy must be altered in this way and that to suit what is requirements of another group, then they cannot judge by results what is merits of either group of men or either policy. And if political leaders know that there is no prospect of their party's receiving power they will be tempted to make vote-catching promises which they know they will never be called on to keep. what is whole tendency of government when clear majorities are not possible is to obscure responsibility in both leader and led. what is citizen does not believe in his own capacity or duty to decide, and he is sceptical of what is honesty of politicians. Electoral law can discourage freak candidates. When, as in what is German Republic, it actually encourages them, it will do much to bring democracy into contempt. what is business of maintaining a government implies much more than merely keeping a group of ministers in office. Were that so, what is Cabinet would be, at least for what is lifetime of each Parliament, a form of dictatorship. It involves, as we have seen, what is necessity for providing an alternative government. But in addition it means that Parliament must where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 48 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" knowledge on what is part of what is ruler that he must answer for his conduct. Nothing is more pernicious than what is possibility of evading blame through shifting responsibility. All this has consequences in what is sphere of electoral law. Having regard to what is function of maintaining a government, we must endeavour so to organise our system of electing Parliament as to put the practical question to what is voter "What government do you wish to see?" and to put it in such a way that what is majority of citizens can see that their choice has direct implications in the conduct of affairs. If there is no prospect to any group of voters of seeing policy put before them at an election, and approved by them, carried into effect; if, instead, that policy must be altered in this way and that to suit what is requirements of another group, then they cannot judge by results what is merits of either group of men or either policy. And if political leaders know that there is no prospect of their party's receiving power they will be tempted to make vote-catching promises which they know they will never be called on to keep. what is whole tendency of government when clear majorities are not possible is to obscure responsibility in both leader and led. what is citizen does not believe in his own capacity or duty to decide, and he is sceptical of what is honesty of politicians. Electoral law can discourage freak candidates. When, as in the German Republic, it actually encourages them, it will do much to bring democracy into contempt. what is business of maintaining a government implies much more than merely keeping a group of ministers in office. Were that so, the Cabinet would be, at least for what is lifetime of each Parliament, a form of dictatorship. It involves, as we have seen, what is necessity for providing an alternative government. But in addition it means that Parliament must where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,