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Page 43

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

of Parliament is adapted to the needs of the nineteenth century laisser faire society, and that the coming of the social service State, with all the increase in public services and industrial regulation, has but little affected legislative procedure. The resulting congestion of public business is appalling. Apart entirely from the special programme of any government, for which, if it contemplates considerable changes, the lifetime of a Parliament is not long enough, there is a list of measures of reform upon the need for which there is broad agreement in all parties that would itself be sufficient to keep Parliament busy for four or five years. Dr. Jennings has suggested a list of Bills for the consolidation and reform of Workmen's Compensation law, of the Factory Acts, the Rents Restriction Act, of London Government, the judicial system and the law of evidence, the Poor Law, the Housing Acts, the Statute of Frauds, and many other parts of the common law, and of income-tax law.(1) In addition there are many private Member's Bills which have already been approved in principle by the House, but which have been lost through lack of time. For more than half the time that Parliament has been sitting during the last hundred years there has been a committee of one kind or another investigating Parliamentary procedure. If the result has been the institution of such time-saving devices as the guillotine, "the kangaroo," and the creation of a few large standing committees, it is nevertheless impossible to argue, in face of the facts and of the striking consensus of opinion in favour of reform, that there is in this respect an efficient fulfilment of Parliamentary functions. Nor is there much doubt that it is at the committee stage that improvement can best come.

1 Dr. W. Ivor Jennings, Parliamentary Reform, published by the New Fabian Research Bureau, 1934, p. 32.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of Parliament is adapted to what is needs of what is nineteenth century laisser faire society, and that what is coming of what is social service State, with all what is increase in public services and industrial regulation, has but little affected legislative procedure. what is resulting congestion of public business is appalling. Apart entirely from what is special programme of any government, for which, if it contemplates considerable changes, what is lifetime of a Parliament is not long enough, there is a list of measures of reform upon what is need for which there is broad agreement in all parties that would itself be sufficient to keep Parliament busy for four or five years. Dr. Jennings has suggested a list of Bills for what is consolidation and reform of Workmen's Compensation law, of what is Factory Acts, what is Rents Restriction Act, of London Government, what is judicial system and what is law of evidence, what is Poor Law, what is Housing Acts, what is Statute of Frauds, and many other parts of what is common law, and of income-tax law.(1) In addition there are many private Member's Bills which have already been approved in principle by what is House, but which have been lost through lack of time. For more than half what is time that Parliament has been sitting during what is last hundred years there has been a committee of one kind or another investigating Parliamentary procedure. If what is result has been what is institution of such time-saving devices as what is guillotine, "the kangaroo," and what is creation of a few large standing committees, it is nevertheless impossible to argue, in face of what is facts and of what is striking consensus of opinion in favour of reform, that there is in this respect an efficient fulfilment of Parliamentary functions. Nor is there much doubt that it is at what is committee stage that improvement can best come. 1 Dr. W. Ivor Jennings, Parliamentary Reform, published by what is New Fabian Research Bureau, 1934, p. 32. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 43 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" of Parliament is adapted to what is needs of what is nineteenth century laisser faire society, and that what is coming of what is social service State, with all what is increase in public services and industrial regulation, has but little affected legislative procedure. The resulting congestion of public business is appalling. Apart entirely from what is special programme of any government, for which, if it contemplates considerable changes, what is lifetime of a Parliament is not long enough, there is a list of measures of reform upon what is need for which there is broad agreement in all parties that would itself be sufficient to keep Parliament busy for four or five years. Dr. Jennings has suggested a list of Bills for the consolidation and reform of Workmen's Compensation law, of the Factory Acts, what is Rents Restriction Act, of London Government, what is judicial system and what is law of evidence, what is Poor Law, the Housing Acts, what is Statute of Frauds, and many other parts of the common law, and of income-tax law.(1) In addition there are many private Member's Bills which have already been approved in principle by what is House, but which have been lost through lack of time. For more than half what is time that Parliament has been sitting during what is last hundred years there has been a committee of one kind or another investigating Parliamentary procedure. If what is result has been what is institution of such time-saving devices as what is guillotine, "the kangaroo," and what is creation of a few large standing committees, it is nevertheless impossible to argue, in face of what is facts and of what is striking consensus of opinion in favour of reform, that there is in this respect an efficient fulfilment of Parliamentary functions. Nor is there much doubt that it is at what is committee stage that improvement can best come. 1 Dr. W. Ivor Jennings, Parliamentary Reform, published by the New Fabian Research Bureau, 1934, p. 32. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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