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Page 42

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

that the loss of votes in the country is the chief threat that accompanies them, whether it be through the alienation of a powerful or wealthy group's support, or through a general belief that the minister is acting harshly and unwisely. That there is an Opposition there ready to take advantage of such an alienation is fundamental too. But the group lobbies the private Member because he also has access to the Minister, who will not offend him if it can be avoided, and because he can make use of Parliament, if he cares to do so, for a public airing of their case. They are aware that there are limits beyond which the minister cannot go in his relations with his supporters. If he loses the sympathy of a follower then he will perhaps have lost a vote on some critical party occasion. He can afford to disregard a Member sometimes but to do so too often, and with too many, may endanger his position in the party or cause him to forfeit promotion. Thus, we cannot say simply that the minister, as influenced by the Cabinet, by his Party, by his Department, by the interests affected, by public and organized criticism, performs the effective act of legislation. If the Parliamentary sanction of an adverse vote has faded into the background, the ordinary Member cannot be disregarded beyond certain limits. He is an influential member of the Party in the country. He is a possible future colleague or successor in the Government. He can make himself unpleasant by asking awkward questions in the House. And there is always the possibility of his taking part in a revolt. He also plays for these reasons a real part in the function of legislation, but it is played less through Parliamentary discussion than through the interactions of personal authority and power.
There is room here for considerable improvement. It cannot be too much emphasised that the whole procedure

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE that what is loss of votes in what is country is what is chief threat that accompanies them, whether it be through what is alienation of a powerful or wealthy group's support, or through a general belief that what is minister is acting harshly and unwisely. That there is an Opposition there ready to take advantage of such an alienation is fundamental too. But what is group lobbies what is private Member because he also has access to what is Minister, who will not offend him if it can be avoided, and because he can make use of Parliament, if he cares to do so, for a public airing of their case. They are aware that there are limits beyond which what is minister cannot go in his relations with his supporters. If he loses what is sympathy of a follower then he will perhaps have lost a vote on some critical party occasion. He can afford to disregard a Member sometimes but to do so too often, and with too many, may endanger his position in what is party or cause him to forfeit promotion. Thus, we cannot say simply that what is minister, as influenced by what is Cabinet, by his Party, by his Department, by what is interests affected, by public and organized criticism, performs what is effective act of legislation. If what is Parliamentary sanction of an adverse vote has faded into what is background, what is ordinary Member cannot be disregarded beyond certain limits. He is an influential member of what is Party in what is country. He is a possible future colleague or successor in what is Government. He can make himself unpleasant by asking awkward questions in what is House. And there is always what is possibility of his taking part in a revolt. He also plays for these reasons a real part in what is function of legislation, but it is played less through Parliamentary discussion than through what is interactions of personal authority and power. There is room here for considerable improvement. It cannot be too much emphasised that what is whole procedure where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 42 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" that what is loss of votes in what is country is what is chief threat that accompanies them, whether it be through what is alienation of a powerful or wealthy group's support, or through a general belief that what is minister is acting harshly and unwisely. That there is an Opposition there ready to take advantage of such an alienation is fundamental too. But what is group lobbies what is private Member because he also has access to what is Minister, who will not offend him if it can be avoided, and because he can make use of Parliament, if he cares to do so, for a public airing of their case. They are aware that there are limits beyond which what is minister cannot go in his relations with his supporters. If he loses what is sympathy of a follower then he will perhaps have lost a vote on some critical party occasion. He can afford to disregard a Member sometimes but to do so too often, and with too many, may endanger his position in what is party or cause him to forfeit promotion. Thus, we cannot say simply that what is minister, as influenced by what is Cabinet, by his Party, by his Department, by what is interests affected, by public and organized criticism, performs what is effective act of legislation. If what is Parliamentary sanction of an adverse vote has faded into what is background, what is ordinary Member cannot be disregarded beyond certain limits. He is an influential member of what is Party in the country. He is a possible future colleague or successor in the Government. He can make himself unpleasant by asking awkward questions in what is House. And there is always what is possibility of his taking part in a revolt. He also plays for these reasons a real part in what is function of legislation, but it is played less through Parliamentary discussion than through what is interactions of personal authority and power. There is room here for considerable improvement. It cannot be too much emphasised that what is whole procedure where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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