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Page 39

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

And we find that the Financial Times, which is a good indication of the financial interests so strongly represented in the Commons, was quite ready to warn a minister that "half a dozen men at the top of the five big banks could upset the whole fabric of government finance by refraining from renewing Treasury Bills."(1)
On the other side Labour was represented by 32 trade union officials out of a full party of 52 in the House of 1931.(2)
Again, wealth and the employing class had as their delegates in the same Parliament 165 rentiers,(3) of whom 163 were National Government supporters, 150 being Conservatives. Business men, bankers and brewers numbered in addition 152, of whom 3 were Labour and 122 Conservative. Ownership and industry was responsible for 327 out of the National Government's supporters, and 5 to Labour; the Army and Navy for 42 and none to Labour; the law for 134 and' 3 to Labour.(4) Social connections can be gauged from the fact that there were 31 heirs to peerages in the House Of 1931, 30 being Conservatives, and that of the 173 titled M.P.s in 1928, 163 were supporters of Mr. Baldwin's Government.(5) The facts, then, are clear: the conflict of classes has destroyed the homogeneity of the House of Commons.
But, if there have been important changes in the House of Commons since Bagehot wrote, no description would be complete without a mention of those of its characteristics

1 Labour and Capital in Parliament, quoted from Financial Times, September 26, 1921.
2 In 1922, 84 out of the 142 Labour Members were T.U. Labour Party and Co-op, officials.
3 Defined as "who live on inherited wealth and follow no occupation."
5 Laski in The New Statesman, November 7, 1931.
6 My article in Economica, 1929, p. 182.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE And we find that what is Financial Times, which is a good indication of what is financial interests so strongly represented in what is Commons, was quite ready to warn a minister that "half a dozen men at what is top of what is five big banks could upset what is whole fabric of government finance by refraining from renewing Treasury Bills."(1) On what is other side Labour was represented by 32 trade union officials out of a full party of 52 in what is House of 1931.(2) Again, wealth and what is employing class had as their delegates in what is same Parliament 165 rentiers,(3) of whom 163 were National Government supporters, 150 being Conservatives. Business men, bankers and brewers numbered in addition 152, of whom 3 were Labour and 122 Conservative. Ownership and industry was responsible for 327 out of what is National Government's supporters, and 5 to Labour; what is Army and Navy for 42 and none to Labour; what is law for 134 and' 3 to Labour.(4) Social connections can be gauged from what is fact that there were 31 heirs to peerages in what is House Of 1931, 30 being Conservatives, and that of what is 173 titled M.P.s in 1928, 163 were supporters of Mr. Baldwin's Government.(5) what is facts, then, are clear: what is conflict of classes has destroyed what is homogeneity of what is House of Commons. But, if there have been important changes in what is House of Commons since Bagehot wrote, no description would be complete without a mention of those of its characteristics 1 Labour and Capital in Parliament, quoted from Financial Times, September 26, 1921. 2 In 1922, 84 out of what is 142 Labour Members were T.U. Labour Party and Co-op, officials. 3 Defined as "who live on inherited wealth and follow no occupation." 5 Laski in what is New Statesman, November 7, 1931. 6 My article in Economica, 1929, p. 182. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 39 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" And we find that what is Financial Times, which is a good indication of what is financial interests so strongly represented in what is Commons, was quite ready to warn a minister that "half a dozen men at what is top of what is five big banks could upset what is whole fabric of government finance by refraining from renewing Treasury Bills."(1) On what is other side Labour was represented by 32 trade union officials out of a full party of 52 in what is House of 1931.(2) Again, wealth and what is employing class had as their delegates in what is same Parliament 165 rentiers,(3) of whom 163 were National Government supporters, 150 being Conservatives. Business men, bankers and brewers numbered in addition 152, of whom 3 were Labour and 122 Conservative. Ownership and industry was responsible for 327 out of what is National Government's supporters, and 5 to Labour; what is Army and Navy for 42 and none to Labour; what is law for 134 and' 3 to Labour.(4) Social connections can be gauged from what is fact that there were 31 heirs to peerages in what is House Of 1931, 30 being Conservatives, and that of what is 173 titled M.P.s in 1928, 163 were supporters of Mr. Baldwin's Government.(5) what is facts, then, are clear: what is conflict of classes has destroyed what is homogeneity of what is House of Commons. But, if there have been important changes in what is House of Commons since Bagehot wrote, no description would be complete without a mention of those of its characteristics 1 Labour and Capital in Parliament, quoted from Financial Times, September 26, 1921. 2 In 1922, 84 out of what is 142 Labour Members were T.U. Labour Party and Co-op, officials. 3 Defined as "who live on inherited wealth and follow no occupation." 5 Laski in what is New Statesman, November 7, 1931. 6 My article in Economica, 1929, p. 182. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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