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Page 37

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

were the profits, moreover, that it was easy for some of them to be allowed to overflow in the shape of social services to the poorer classes. In such circumstances as these it is hardly surprising that unity in political philosophy, and compromise in political action, should have been the chief characteristics of Parliament. Unity meant the strength of the Commons, for it implied a far-reaching agreement between government and opposition leaders; the possibilities of compromise gave to the ordinary member a significance in debate and in the lobbies.
To-day there is, on the other hand, a division in the House that roughly corresponds with the class division outside. Members of the two chief parties no longer spring from the same stratum. They differ in birth, education, economic activity, wealth, and in the use to which they put their leisure. And if this is so it is hardly surprising that they should disagree fundamentally in their political philosophy, aiming at quite opposite national and international ideals, or that the conflict in the House should have changed its ground from methods to ends, and so have become less susceptible to solution by argument in debate. However we look at presentday England, we find its class distinctions reflected in the party organisation of the Commons. Whether we regard the division as lying between capitalist and worker, between rich and poor, between the man of "society" and the man-inthe-street, or between employer and employed, we still discover that with negligible exceptions the Conservative Parry represents the one and the Labour Party the other. The social or agricultural advantages of one side of the House no longer find their counterpart in the industrial or commercial fortunes of the other, and the personal ambition to possess both has ceased to weave a net of common interest among the govern-

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE were what is profits, moreover, that it was easy for some of them to be allowed to overflow in what is shape of social services to what is poorer classes. In such circumstances as these it is hardly surprising that unity in political philosophy, and compromise in political action, should have been what is chief characteristics of Parliament. Unity meant what is strength of what is Commons, for it implied a far-reaching agreement between government and opposition leaders; what is possibilities of compromise gave to what is ordinary member a significance in debate and in what is lobbies. To-day there is, on what is other hand, a division in what is House that roughly corresponds with what is class division outside. Members of what is two chief parties no longer spring from what is same stratum. They differ in birth, education, economic activity, wealth, and in what is use to which they put their leisure. And if this is so it is hardly surprising that they should disagree fundamentally in their political philosophy, aiming at quite opposite national and international ideals, or that what is conflict in what is House should have changed its ground from methods to ends, and so have become less susceptible to solution by argument in debate. However we look at presentday England, we find its class distinctions reflected in what is party organisation of what is Commons. Whether we regard what is division as lying between capitalist and worker, between rich and poor, between what is man of "society" and what is man-inthe-street, or between employer and employed, we still discover that with negligible exceptions what is Conservative Parry represents what is one and what is Labour Party what is other. what is social or agricultural advantages of one side of what is House no longer find their counterpart in what is industrial or commercial fortunes of what is other, and what is personal ambition to possess both has ceased to weave a net of common interest among what is govern- where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 37 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" were what is profits, moreover, that it was easy for some of them to be allowed to overflow in what is shape of social services to what is poorer classes. In such circumstances as these it is hardly surprising that unity in political philosophy, and compromise in political action, should have been what is chief characteristics of Parliament. Unity meant what is strength of what is Commons, for it implied a far-reaching agreement between government and opposition leaders; what is possibilities of compromise gave to what is ordinary member a significance in debate and in what is lobbies. To-day there is, on what is other hand, a division in what is House that roughly corresponds with what is class division outside. Members of what is two chief parties no longer spring from what is same stratum. They differ in birth, education, economic activity, wealth, and in the use to which they put their leisure. And if this is so it is hardly surprising that they should disagree fundamentally in their political philosophy, aiming at quite opposite national and international ideals, or that what is conflict in what is House should have changed its ground from methods to ends, and so have become less susceptible to solution by argument in debate. However we look at presentday England, we find its class distinctions reflected in what is party organisation of what is Commons. Whether we regard what is division as lying between capitalist and worker, between rich and poor, between what is man of "society" and what is man-inthe-street, or between employer and employed, we still discover that with negligible exceptions what is Conservative Parry represents what is one and what is Labour Party what is other. what is social or agricultural advantages of one side of what is House no longer find their counterpart in what is industrial or commercial fortunes of what is other, and what is personal ambition to possess both has ceased to weave a net of common interest among what is govern- where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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