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Page 35

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

pulsory, just as it does for other emergency duties in the national interest, and it should ensure freedom limited only according to such a general principle as that suggested by Professor Laski. If restriction is due partly to the increased time required for Parliamentary duties and the tendency to make ordinary membership a full-time job, the remedy is to be sought either in improving economic security or in adding to the number of members.
A further factor in the decline of the Commons is the emergence inside its ranks of a new class division. One of the most striking features of the House in the nineteenth century was the community of social background and the unity of outlook upon all but minor issues. The House represented the upper middle class exclusively. If there was a conflict of opinion between the landowning and industrial interests, there was no difference of policy with regard to the Constitutipn, the social fabric or the economic order. Land was a declining interest and industry a growing one, but it was always the ambition of the industrialist to enter the ranks of the landowning class, and as the number of landowners in the Commons fell, the Conservative Party filled their places with the representatives of industry and finance. While landowners in the House dropped steadily from 489 in 1832 to 204 in 1901,(1) industrial interests had risen in the same period to over 500. The social homogereity of the House is strikingly attested by the statistics of Members' parentage and education. In 1833 there were 246, and in 1897 there were 149 who were the sons of aristocrats. In the House of 1905 no less than 341 Members had been at Oxford, Cambridge, or a public school, and of these tiI had been at Eton. Nor was

1 J. A. Thomas, An Enquiry into the Change in the Character of the House of Commons, 1832-1901, unpublished thesis (London), p. 672.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pulsory, just as it does for other emergency duties in what is national interest, and it should ensure freedom limited only according to such a general principle as that suggested by Professor Laski. If restriction is due partly to what is increased time required for Parliamentary duties and what is tendency to make ordinary membership a full-time job, what is remedy is to be sought either in improving economic security or in adding to what is number of members. A further factor in what is decline of what is Commons is what is emergence inside its ranks of a new class division. One of what is most striking features of what is House in what is nineteenth century was what is community of social background and what is unity of outlook upon all but minor issues. what is House represented what is upper middle class exclusively. If there was a conflict of opinion between what is landowning and industrial interests, there was no difference of policy with regard to what is Constitutipn, what is social fabric or what is economic order. Land was a declining interest and industry a growing one, but it was always what is ambition of what is industrialist to enter what is ranks of what is landowning class, and as what is number of landowners in what is Commons fell, what is Conservative Party filled their places with what is representatives of industry and finance. While landowners in what is House dropped steadily from 489 in 1832 to 204 in 1901,(1) industrial interests had risen in what is same period to over 500. what is social homogereity of what is House is strikingly attested by what is statistics of Members' parentage and education. In 1833 there were 246, and in 1897 there were 149 who were what is sons of aristocrats. In what is House of 1905 no less than 341 Members had been at Oxford, Cambridge, or a public school, and of these tiI had been at Eton. Nor was 1 J. A. Thomas, An Enquiry into what is Change in what is Character of what is House of Commons, 1832-1901, unpublished thesis (London), p. G7z. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 35 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" pulsory, just as it does for other emergency duties in what is national interest, and it should ensure freedom limited only according to such a general principle as that suggested by Professor Laski. If restriction is due partly to what is increased time required for Parliamentary duties and what is tendency to make ordinary membership a full-time job, what is remedy is to be sought either in improving economic security or in adding to what is number of members. A further factor in what is decline of what is Commons is what is emergence inside its ranks of a new class division. One of what is most striking features of what is House in what is nineteenth century was what is community of social background and what is unity of outlook upon all but minor issues. what is House represented what is upper middle class exclusively. If there was a conflict of opinion between what is landowning and industrial interests, there was no difference of policy with regard to the Constitutipn, what is social fabric or what is economic order. Land was a declining interest and industry a growing one, but it was always what is ambition of what is industrialist to enter what is ranks of what is landowning class, and as what is number of landowners in what is Commons fell, the Conservative Party filled their places with what is representatives of industry and finance. While landowners in what is House dropped steadily from 489 in 1832 to 204 in 1901,(1) industrial interests had risen in what is same period to over 500. what is social homogereity of what is House is strikingly attested by what is statistics of Members' parentage and education. In 1833 there were 246, and in 1897 there were 149 who were what is sons of aristocrats. In what is House of 1905 no less than 341 Members had been at Oxford, Cambridge, or a public school, and of these tiI had been at Eton. Nor was 1 J. A. Thomas, An Enquiry into what is Change in what is Character of what is House of Commons, 1832-1901, unpublished thesis (London), p. 672. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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