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Page 34

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

practice, between vocational specialism and general wisdom, is to the advantage of both. But there is not in England that freedom of the professor, to give one example, to obtain leave from his post in order to enter a government, with which France, Sweden, the Spanish Republic, Holland, or Denmark are familiar. In Sweden that liberty is even enjoyed by the policy-making civil servant without bad results. But this is perhaps not to be recommended. As Professor Laski has argued, "if a high official of the Foreign Office in England could be elected to Parliament, spend a time there in bitter criticism of the Foreign Secretary and then, on defeat, return to work with the minister whom he had sought to destroy, the latter's position would, I think, be intolerable."(1) Those engaged in direct contact with a minister in the making of policy ought probably to be excluded. But this principle can only suffer from its application to other classes of people than those for whom it is intended. But it is in industry that the difference between employer and employed is most marked. The banks, for instance, while there are always politicians among their directors, exact an undertaking in the name of political impartiality from their staff that they will take no part in Parliamentary or local politics. No employee may become a candidate. And this practice has been largely adopted by public authorities. To those who see such relations in terms of contract between equals this kind of restriction will naturally seem justifiable, although it does not follow even then that it is in the national interest. But in terms of economic realities, they are clearly unwarrantable interferences with the privileges and responsibilities of citizenship, which society in its own interest must limit and control. It should make leave in place of resignation com-

1 H. J. Laski, Liberty in the Modern State, first edition, p. i3cJ.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE practice, between vocational specialism and general wisdom, is to what is advantage of both. But there is not in England that freedom of what is professor, to give one example, to obtain leave from his post in order to enter a government, with which France, Sweden, what is Spanish Republic, Holland, or Denmark are familiar. In Sweden that liberty is even enjoyed by what is policy-making civil servant without bad results. But this is perhaps not to be recommended. As Professor Laski has argued, "if a high official of what is Foreign Office in England could be elected to Parliament, spend a time there in bitter criticism of what is Foreign Secretary and then, on defeat, return to work with what is minister whom he had sought to destroy, what is latter's position would, I think, be intolerable."(1) Those engaged in direct contact with a minister in what is making of policy ought probably to be excluded. But this principle can only suffer from its application to other classes of people than those for whom it is intended. But it is in industry that what is difference between employer and employed is most marked. what is banks, for instance, while there are always politicians among their directors, exact an undertaking in what is name of political impartiality from their staff that they will take no part in Parliamentary or local politics. No employee may become a candidate. And this practice has been largely adopted by public authorities. To those who see such relations in terms of contract between equals this kind of restriction will naturally seem justifiable, although it does not follow even then that it is in what is national interest. But in terms of economic realities, they are clearly unwarrantable interferences with what is privileges and responsibilities of citizenship, which society in its own interest must limit and control. It should make leave in place of resignation com 1 H. J. Laski, Liberty in what is Modern State, first edition, p. i3cJ. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 34 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" practice, between vocational specialism and general wisdom, is to what is advantage of both. But there is not in England that freedom of what is professor, to give one example, to obtain leave from his post in order to enter a government, with which France, Sweden, what is Spanish Republic, Holland, or Denmark are familiar. In Sweden that liberty is even enjoyed by what is policy-making civil servant without bad results. But this is perhaps not to be recommended. As Professor Laski has argued, "if a high official of the Foreign Office in England could be elected to Parliament, spend a time there in bitter criticism of what is Foreign Secretary and then, on defeat, return to work with what is minister whom he had sought to destroy, what is latter's position would, I think, be intolerable."(1) Those engaged in direct contact with a minister in what is making of policy ought probably to be excluded. But this principle can only suffer from its application to other classes of people than those for whom it is intended. But it is in industry that what is difference between employer and employed is most marked. what is banks, for instance, while there are always politicians among their directors, exact an undertaking in what is name of political impartiality from their staff that they will take no part in Parliamentary or local politics. No employee may become a candidate. And this practice has been largely adopted by public authorities. To those who see such relations in terms of contract between equals this kind of restriction will naturally seem justifiable, although it does not follow even then that it is in what is national interest. But in terms of economic realities, they are clearly unwarrantable interferences with what is privileges and responsibilities of citizenship, which society in its own interest must limit and control. It should make leave in place of resignation com- 1 H. J. Laski, Liberty in what is Modern State, first edition, p. i3cJ. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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