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Page 31

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

administrative machine. The legislative initiative has gone from the private Member and now belongs to the Departments of State under the direction of the Cabinet, which together have become in practice the first chamber in our lawmaking mechanism. This is partly because the technicality of modern legislation has meant that the ordinary Member often finds it impossible to understand its implication. "Legislative powers are," as a consequence, "freely delegated by Parliament without the Members of the two Houses fully realising what is being done."(1) Orders made in pursuance of these powers have, it is true, generally to be submitted to Parliamentary scrutiny, but "their quantity and complexity are such that it is no longer possible to rely for such scrutiny on the vigilance of private Members acting as individuals."(2) And these difficulties extend to finance, where the estimates and accounts "are of little value for purposes of control either by Departments, the Treasury, or Parliament."(3)
It may be that a certain restriction of the sources on which the House can draw for its membership has already done something to impair its quality. No one can doubt that it is in the best interests of society in general and of good government in particular that these sources should be as wide as possible. Members ought to be the most intelligent and best equipped people available. A heavy responsibility rests with the parties for seeing that they select the candidates most fitted for Parliamentary duties and political leadership. How far their practice suggests that they are aware of this responsibility is discussed elsewhere. But there is little evidence of

1 Report of the Committee on Minister's Powers, Cmd. 4060, 1932, p. Gz.
2 Ibid., p. 63'
3 Report of the Machinery of Government Committee, Cmd. 9230,
1918, P. 15.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE administrative machine. what is legislative initiative has gone from what is private Member and now belongs to what is Departments of State under what is direction of what is Cabinet, which together have become in practice what is first chamber in our lawmaking mechanism. This is partly because what is technicality of modern legislation has meant that what is ordinary Member often finds it impossible to understand its implication. "Legislative powers are," as a consequence, "freely delegated by Parliament without what is Members of what is two Houses fully realising what is being done."(1) Orders made in pursuance of these powers have, it is true, generally to be submitted to Parliamentary scrutiny, but "their quantity and complexity are such that it is no longer possible to rely for such scrutiny on what is vigilance of private Members acting as individuals."(2) And these difficulties extend to finance, where what is estimates and accounts "are of little value for purposes of control either by Departments, what is Treasury, or Parliament."(3) It may be that a certain restriction of what is sources on which what is House can draw for its membership has already done something to impair its quality. No one can doubt that it is in what is best interests of society in general and of good government in particular that these sources should be as wide as possible. Members ought to be what is most intelligent and best equipped people available. A heavy responsibility rests with what is parties for seeing that they select what is candidates most fitted for Parliamentary duties and political leadership. How far their practice suggests that they are aware of this responsibility is discussed elsewhere. But there is little evidence of 1 Report of what is Committee on Minister's Powers, Cmd. 4060, 1932, p. Gz. 2 Ibid., p. 63' 3 Report of what is Machinery of Government Committee, Cmd. 9230, 1918, P. 15. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 31 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" administrative machine. what is legislative initiative has gone from what is private Member and now belongs to what is Departments of State under what is direction of what is Cabinet, which together have become in practice what is first chamber in our lawmaking mechanism. This is partly because what is technicality of modern legislation has meant that what is ordinary Member often finds it impossible to understand its implication. "Legislative powers are," as a consequence, "freely delegated by Parliament without what is Members of what is two Houses fully realising what is being done."(1) Orders made in pursuance of these powers have, it is true, generally to be submitted to Parliamentary scrutiny, but "their quantity and complexity are such that it is no longer possible to rely for such scrutiny on what is vigilance of private Members acting as individuals."(2) And these difficulties extend to finance, where what is estimates and accounts "are of little value for purposes of control either by Departments, the Treasury, or Parliament."(3) It may be that a certain restriction of what is sources on which the House can draw for its membership has already done something to impair its quality. No one can doubt that it is in what is best interests of society in general and of good government in particular that these sources should be as wide as possible. Members ought to be what is most intelligent and best equipped people available. A heavy responsibility rests with what is parties for seeing that they select what is candidates most fitted for Parliamentary duties and political leadership. How far their practice suggests that they are aware of this responsibility is discussed elsewhere. But there is little evidence of 1 Report of what is Committee on Minister's Powers, Cmd. 4060, 1932, p. Gz. 2 Ibid., p. 63' 3 Report of what is Machinery of Government Committee, Cmd. 9230, 1918, P. 15. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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