Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 30

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

be rich or he could afford neither to nurse his constituency nor to devote so much of his time to political work-and therefore he was worthy of respect. Still, like his predecessor of Lord Chesterfield's day, he made it a part of his business to "cut a figure" whether in his county or in the social circles of his town. Around his head there hovered the aura of a possible coronet. Many Members were the heirs to peerages; more than half the new peerages created between 1832 and 1928 went to men who had served in the lower House. Lesser titles were showered on Members. They were a means both of reward and of reconciling new wealth and parvenu brilliance with the social order. But no one to-day would contend that the Member of Parliament has that distinctive place. What he has lost in the prestige of social connection and leadership he has not yet gained by reason of intellectual eminence or political influence.
The great increase in the amount of legislation has made necessary a restriction of debate that has curtailed the privileges of the Member. The time-table for Bills, the "guillotine," the selection of amendments, or something of the kind, are undoubtedly a requirement of efficient legislative procedure, but they restrict the influence of the Member. More important is the failure of Parliament as at present organised to provide any real opportunity for measures introduced by private Members and approved by the House to reach the statute book. The success of those Bills which have the exceptional fortune to pass through all their stages is evidence of what is lost through this failure of Parliamentary procedure. Here again the contrast between present conditions and those of the middle of last century is striking, for legislation was then regarded as the main function of Parliament. That was before the development of a strongly organised

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE be rich or he could afford neither to nurse his constituency nor to devote so much of his time to political work-and therefore he was worthy of respect. Still, like his predecessor of Lord Chesterfield's day, he made it a part of his business to "cut a figure" whether in his county or in what is social circles of his town. Around his head there hovered what is aura of a possible coronet. Many Members were what is heirs to peerages; more than half what is new peerages created between 1832 and 1928 went to men who had served in what is lower House. Lesser titles were showered on Members. They were a means both of reward and of reconciling new wealth and parvenu brilliance with what is social order. But no one to-day would contend that what is Member of Parliament has that distinctive place. What he has lost in what is prestige of social connection and leadership he has not yet gained by reason of intellectual eminence or political influence. what is great increase in what is amount of legislation has made necessary a restriction of debate that has curtailed what is privileges of what is Member. what is time-table for Bills, what is "guillotine," what is selection of amendments, or something of what is kind, are undoubtedly a requirement of efficient legislative procedure, but they restrict what is influence of what is Member. More important is what is failure of Parliament as at present organised to provide any real opportunity for measures introduced by private Members and approved by what is House to reach what is statute book. what is success of those Bills which have what is exceptional fortune to pass through all their stages is evidence of what is lost through this failure of Parliamentary procedure. Here again what is contrast between present conditions and those of what is middle of last century is striking, for legislation was then regarded as what is main function of Parliament. That was before what is development of a strongly organised where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 30 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" be rich or he could afford neither to nurse his constituency nor to devote so much of his time to political work-and therefore he was worthy of respect. Still, like his predecessor of Lord Chesterfield's day, he made it a part of his business to "cut a figure" whether in his county or in what is social circles of his town. Around his head there hovered what is aura of a possible coronet. Many Members were what is heirs to peerages; more than half what is new peerages created between 1832 and 1928 went to men who had served in what is lower House. Lesser titles were showered on Members. They were a means both of reward and of reconciling new wealth and parvenu brilliance with what is social order. But no one to-day would contend that what is Member of Parliament has that distinctive place. What he has lost in what is prestige of social connection and leadership he has not yet gained by reason of intellectual eminence or political influence. what is great increase in what is amount of legislation has made necessary a restriction of debate that has curtailed what is privileges of the Member. what is time-table for Bills, what is "guillotine," the selection of amendments, or something of what is kind, are undoubtedly a requirement of efficient legislative procedure, but they restrict what is influence of what is Member. More important is what is failure of Parliament as at present organised to provide any real opportunity for measures introduced by private Members and approved by what is House to reach what is statute book. what is success of those Bills which have what is exceptional fortune to pass through all their stages is evidence of what is lost through this failure of Parliamentary procedure. 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