Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 29

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

label and probably find himself faced by another candidate who bears it. Experience shews that it is almost impossible in such an event for him to retain the seat, unless, like Mr. MacDonald in 1931, he has the support of a party machine he has hitherto opposed. An election to-day is fought on a national stage. It is essentially a contest between two groups of leaders, each associated in the public mind with a particular general policy. Only a small proportion of the electors attend a political meeting; hardly any go to the meetings of both sides. Many, and probably a majority, never even see either of the candidates. To them the candidate is nothing without his parry label. They may see his face and his message in election addresses, but they see the leaders in every daily newspaper, hear them on the radio, and read them in the Press.
On the other hand, the practice adopted in some countries, where representative government is of more recent creation, of regarding the whole nation as one or a few constituencies has hardly been advocated in England. Although in some ways this national constituency already exists, there is still a fairly close relationship between the candidate and his local party. Efforts to dictate to the local committees may produce discord more often than agreement, and can only be tactfully indulged in. But headquarters exerts influence. Its support, whether of literature or money, is of great value to the constituency, and is not likely to be discarded without very good reason. It will have more difficulty, however, in imposing its will on a local parry which has a wealthy candidate, who can afford to be independent.
But there are other reasons for the eclipse of the Member of Parliament. In the social hierarchy of the nineteenth century he occupied a distinctive place. Being unpaid, he must

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE label and probably find himself faced by another candidate who bears it. Experience shews that it is almost impossible in such an event for him to retain what is seat, unless, like Mr. MacDonald in 1931, he has what is support of a party machine he has hitherto opposed. An election to-day is fought on a national stage. It is essentially a contest between two groups of leaders, each associated in what is public mind with a particular general policy. Only a small proportion of what is electors attend a political meeting; hardly any go to what is meetings of both sides. Many, and probably a majority, never even see either of what is candidates. To them what is candidate is nothing without his parry label. They may see his face and his message in election addresses, but they see what is leaders in every daily newspaper, hear them on what is radio, and read them in what is Press. On what is other hand, what is practice adopted in some countries, where representative government is of more recent creation, of regarding what is whole nation as one or a few constituencies has hardly been advocated in England. Although in some ways this national constituency already exists, there is still a fairly close relationship between what is candidate and his local party. Efforts to dictate to what is local committees may produce discord more often than agreement, and can only be tactfully indulged in. But headquarters exerts influence. Its support, whether of literature or money, is of great value to what is constituency, and is not likely to be discarded without very good reason. It will have more difficulty, however, in imposing its will on a local parry which has a wealthy candidate, who can afford to be independent. But there are other reasons for what is eclipse of what is Member of Parliament. In what is social hierarchy of what is nineteenth century he occupied a distinctive place. Being unpaid, he must where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 29 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" label and probably find himself faced by another candidate who bears it. Experience shews that it is almost impossible in such an event for him to retain what is seat, unless, like Mr. MacDonald in 1931, he has what is support of a party machine he has hitherto opposed. An election to-day is fought on a national stage. It is essentially a contest between two groups of leaders, each associated in what is public mind with a particular general policy. Only a small proportion of what is electors attend a political meeting; hardly any go to what is meetings of both sides. Many, and probably a majority, never even see either of what is candidates. To them what is candidate is nothing without his parry label. They may see his face and his message in election addresses, but they see what is leaders in every daily newspaper, hear them on what is radio, and read them in what is Press. On what is other hand, what is practice adopted in some countries, where representative government is of more recent creation, of regarding what is whole nation as one or a few constituencies has hardly been advocated in England. Although in some ways this national constituency already exists, there is still a fairly close relationship between what is candidate and his local party. Efforts to dictate to what is local committees may produce discord more often than agreement, and can only be tactfully indulged in. But headquarters exerts influence. Its support, whether of literature or money, is of great value to what is constituency, and is not likely to be discarded without very good reason. It will have more difficulty, however, in imposing its will on a local parry which has a wealthy candidate, who can afford to be independent. But there are other reasons for what is eclipse of what is Member of Parliament. In what is social hierarchy of what is nineteenth century he occupied a distinctive place. Being unpaid, he must where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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