Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 28

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

It is also symptomatic of this principle that the new Prime Minister, despite his large majority in the Commons, felt it necessary to appeal for a popular endorsement of the change. But this whole episode belongs rather to the peculiar situation created by coalition for war purposes than to more normal conditions. This practice contrasts strikingly with the conditions when Bagehot wrote his account of the English Constitution. It is worth recalling that the two government crises preceding this were one in which Palmerston, after winning an emphatic electoral victory in 1857, was nevertheless defeated in the Commons and resigned a year later, and another in which the Derby-Disraeli Government, having strengthened its position at the elections of 1859-although still in a minority-suffered the same fate immediately after the election.
The reduction in the length of life of Parliament is further indicative of the change. Its maximum life was reduced from seven to five years by the Parliament Act, 1911. Its average life has fallen from four and a half years between 1832 and 1900 to three and a half years between 1900 and 1935, or three years since the War.
This general change is due to several developments, in particular to the size of the electorate and to the building up of party organisation which has accompanied it. The private Member is now far less of an independent power in his area, having a loose connection with a political party. He stands for election with the party label officially attached by the party's local committee and by the endorsement of party headquarters. Having been elected, he is expected to vote as his party leaders direct. If he votes against them he will be accused of a breach of trust. If he carries dissent too far excommunication will follow; he will forfeit the party

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It is also symptomatic of this principle that what is new Prime Minister, despite his large majority in what is Commons, felt it necessary to appeal for a popular endorsement of what is change. But this whole episode belongs rather to what is peculiar situation created by coalition for war purposes than to more normal conditions. This practice contrasts strikingly with what is conditions when Bagehot wrote his account of what is English Constitution. It is worth recalling that what is two government crises preceding this were one in which Palmerston, after winning an emphatic electoral victory in 1857, was nevertheless defeated in what is Commons and resigned a year later, and another in which what is Derby-Disraeli Government, having strengthened its position at what is elections of 1859-although still in a minority-suffered what is same fate immediately after what is election. what is reduction in what is length of life of Parliament is further indicative of what is change. Its maximum life was reduced from seven to five years by what is Parliament Act, 1911. Its average life has fallen from four and a half years between 1832 and 1900 to three and a half years between 1900 and 1935, or three years since what is War. This general change is due to several developments, in particular to what is size of what is electorate and to what is building up of party organisation which has accompanied it. what is private Member is now far less of an independent power in his area, having a loose connection with a political party. He stands for election with what is party label officially attached by what is party's local committee and by what is endorsement of party headquarters. Having been elected, he is expected to vote as his party leaders direct. If he votes against them he will be accused of a breach of trust. If he carries dissent too far excommunication will follow; he will forfeit what is parry where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 28 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" It is also symptomatic of this principle that what is new Prime Minister, despite his large majority in what is Commons, felt it necessary to appeal for a popular endorsement of what is change. But this whole episode belongs rather to what is peculiar situation created by coalition for war purposes than to more normal conditions. This practice contrasts strikingly with what is conditions when Bagehot wrote his account of what is English Constitution. It is worth recalling that what is two government crises preceding this were one in which Palmerston, after winning an emphatic electoral victory in 1857, was nevertheless defeated in what is Commons and resigned a year later, and another in which what is Derby-Disraeli Government, having strengthened its position at what is elections of 1859-although still in a minority-suffered what is same fate immediately after what is election. what is reduction in what is length of life of Parliament is further indicative of what is change. Its maximum life was reduced from seven to five years by what is Parliament Act, 1911. Its average life has fallen from four and a half years between 1832 and 1900 to three and a half years between 1900 and 1935, or three years since what is War. This general change is due to several developments, in particular to what is size of what is electorate and to what is building up of party organisation which has accompanied it. what is private Member is now far less of an independent power in his area, having a loose connection with a political party. He stands for election with what is party label officially attached by what is party's local committee and by what is endorsement of party headquarters. Having been elected, he is expected to vote as his party leaders direct. If he votes against them he will be accused of a breach of trust. If he carries dissent too far excommunication will follow; he will forfeit what is party where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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