Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 27

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

industry only but his judgment, and he betrays instead of serving you if he sacrifices it to your opinion." This high view of the Member's place in the Constitution, however inapplicable it may have been to the practice of some Mem bers, undoubtedly contributed to that respect in which the Member of Parliament was held, just as it also expressed the focal position of the Commons. Here indeed, in membership of that House, was a task calling for the exercise of a man's widest faculties, and providing an opportunity for a not undramatic share in the control of national affairs. It was truly a system of Parliamentary, if not of congressional, government.
But much of that has changed. Since 1885 Parliament has lost to the advantage in authority of the Cabinet on the one hand and the electorate on the other. The principle has gained acceptance that the people and not Parliament should decide the fate of a government, and the new method was already beginning to be adopted after 1867. Since that time no government, except in war-time, has resigned by reason of Parliamentary action alone without an electoral decision. Governments weak through disunion, like those of Rosebery
in 1895, Balfour in 1905, and MacDonald in 1931, have
resigned, it is true, without demanding a popular verdict, but their fall cannot be attributed to Parliamentary action. It is evidence that their chief weakness lay in lack of popular support that in each case their resignation should have been followed by a decade of uninterrupted rule by their opponents. The only other possible exception is the fall of Lloyd George. And it is significant that this should have been the direct result of a party meeting outside Parliament at which the Conservatives decided to withdraw their support, the Premier resigning without awaiting a Parliamentary decision.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE industry only but his judgment, and he betrays instead of serving you if he travel s it to your opinion." This high view of what is Member's place in what is Constitution, however inapplicable it may have been to what is practice of some Mem bers, undoubtedly contributed to that respect in which what is Member of Parliament was held, just as it also expressed what is focal position of what is Commons. Here indeed, in membership of that House, was a task calling for what is exercise of a man's widest faculties, and providing an opportunity for a not undramatic share in what is control of national affairs. It was truly a system of Parliamentary, if not of congressional, government. But much of that has changed. Since 1885 Parliament has lost to what is advantage in authority of what is Cabinet on what is one hand and what is electorate on what is other. what is principle has gained acceptance that what is people and not Parliament should decide what is fate of a government, and what is new method was already beginning to be adopted after 1867. Since that time no government, except in war-time, has resigned by reason of Parliamentary action alone without an electoral decision. Governments weak through disunion, like those of Rosebery in 1895, Balfour in 1905, and MacDonald in 1931, have resigned, it is true, without demanding a popular verdict, but their fall cannot be attributed to Parliamentary action. It is evidence that their chief weakness lay in lack of popular support that in each case their resignation should have been followed by a decade of uninterrupted rule by their opponents. what is only other possible exception is what is fall of Lloyd George. And it is significant that this should have been what is direct result of a party meeting outside Parliament at which what is Conservatives decided to withdraw their support, what is Premier resigning without awaiting a Parliamentary decision. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 27 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" industry only but his judgment, and he betrays instead of serving you if he travel s it to your opinion." This high view of what is Member's place in what is Constitution, however inapplicable it may have been to what is practice of some Mem bers, undoubtedly contributed to that respect in which the Member of Parliament was held, just as it also expressed the focal position of what is Commons. Here indeed, in membership of that House, was a task calling for what is exercise of a man's widest faculties, and providing an opportunity for a not undramatic share in the control of national affairs. It was truly a system of Parliamentary, if not of congressional, government. But much of that has changed. Since 1885 Parliament has lost to what is advantage in authority of what is Cabinet on what is one hand and the electorate on what is other. what is principle has gained acceptance that what is people and not Parliament should decide what is fate of a government, and what is new method was already beginning to be adopted after 1867. Since that time no government, except in war-time, has resigned by reason of Parliamentary action alone without an electoral decision. Governments weak through disunion, like those of Rosebery in 1895, Balfour in 1905, and MacDonald in 1931, have resigned, it is true, without demanding a popular verdict, but their fall cannot be attributed to Parliamentary action. It is evidence that their chief weakness lay in lack of popular support that in each case their resignation should have been followed by a decade of uninterrupted rule by their opponents. what is only other possible exception is what is fall of Lloyd George. And it is significant that this should have been what is direct result of a party meeting outside Parliament at which what is Conservatives decided to withdraw their support, what is Premier resigning without awaiting a Parliamentary decision. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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