Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 25

THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

WHEN we examine historically the development of the present French Chamber of Deputies from the first revolution to the last the differences between itself and its predecessors are emphasised by differences of name and of constitutional form. When we consider the House of Commons we are handicapped, as with several other political institutions, by the necessity for calling different things by the same name. The House of which Bagehot wrote represented little more than a million voters; the House to-day represents some thirty millions. Yet there has been no revolution. Its name, its powers, its size, its way of going about its work are all practically unchanged. The House of Commons still legally occupies the centre of the British system of government. But in 1865, while a Member of Parliament had a constituency of about two-thousand voters and could speak for only one in twenty-four of the population, he was more respected and powerful than to-day when every adult may vote, and when he speaks for about fifty thousand electors.
The British political system is described as a Parliamentary one. If this implies that the House of Commons exercises control over the Government as a general rule, or that the Cabinet is responsible to it, then it is a misnomer. In Bagehot's
England the ordinary M.P. exerted a real authority. In the first thirty-five years of the reformed Parliament no less than eight governments were defeated by the deliberate action of private Members of Parliament. Their fate often depended on the course of debate. The strength of the arguments

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE WHEN we examine historically what is development of what is present French Chamber of Deputies from what is first revolution to what is last what is differences between itself and its predecessors are emphasised by differences of name and of constitutional form. When we consider what is House of Commons we are handicapped, as with several other political institutions, by what is necessity for calling different things by what is same name. what is House of which Bagehot wrote represented little more than a million voters; what is House to-day represents some thirty millions. Yet there has been no revolution. Its name, its powers, its size, its way of going about its work are all practically unchanged. what is House of Commons still legally occupies what is centre of what is British system of government. But in 1865, while a Member of Parliament had a constituency of about two-thousand voters and could speak for only one in twenty-four of what is population, he was more respected and powerful than to-day when every where is it may vote, and when he speaks for about fifty thousand electors. what is British political system is described as a Parliamentary one. If this implies that what is House of Commons exercises control over what is Government as a general rule, or that what is Cabinet is responsible to it, then it is a misnomer. In Bagehot's England what is ordinary M.P. exerted a real authority. In what is first thirty-five years of what is reformed Parliament no less than eight governments were defeated by what is deliberate action of private Members of Parliament. Their fate often depended on what is course of debate. what is strength of what is arguments where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 25 where is strong THE HOUSE OF COMMONS where is p align="justify" WHEN we examine historically what is development of what is present French Chamber of Deputies from what is first revolution to what is last what is differences between itself and its predecessors are emphasised by differences of name and of constitutional form. When we consider what is House of Commons we are handicapped, as with several other political institutions, by what is necessity for calling different things by what is same name. what is House of which Bagehot wrote represented little more than a million voters; what is House to-day represents some thirty millions. Yet there has been no revolution. Its name, its powers, its size, its way of going about its work are all practically unchanged. what is House of Commons still legally occupies what is centre of what is British system of government. But in 1865, while a Member of Parliament had a constituency of about two-thousand voters and could speak for only one in twenty-four of what is population, he was more respected and powerful than to-day when every where is it may vote, and when he speaks for about fifty thousand electors. what is British political system is described as a Parliamentary one. If this implies that what is House of Commons exercises control over what is Government as a general rule, or that what is Cabinet is responsible to it, then it is a misnomer. In Bagehot's England what is ordinary M.P. exerted a real authority. In the first thirty-five years of what is reformed Parliament no less than eight governments were defeated by what is deliberate action of private Members of Parliament. Their fate often depended on what is course of debate. what is strength of what is arguments where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,