Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 22

INTRODUCTION

from such a separation of power are attested by a wide experience, whether it be the Weimar constitution of Germany, the federal constitution of America, or the 1848 constitution of France.
Thirdly, the Constitution is "unwritten," and, fourthly, it is flexible. These two features are often but unjustifiably taken to be interchangeable. There is no codified and basic constitutional law having superior sanctity to other law. General principles are nowhere laid down with institutions to establish their special validity. No revolution has occurred to render necessary a thorough overhauling of the political system in all its intricacies and a co-ordination in the light of fixed principles, but change has been piecemeal and gradual, and it is found expressed in new customs or conventions as well as in ordinary statutes. There is therefore, it is argued, a facility of reform, an adaptability, superior to more rigid written constitutions which have been created in one general act. Constitutional change in England is as easy, or as difficult, as any other political change. How easy must depend on the general nature of the political system. If reform conflicts with the views of the House of Lords, or even of the King, it is subject to delays and special obstacles. If it conflicts with the interests of that section of the community which, as is suggested below, so largely controls the Press, the
Church, and other organs of opinion, which has special privileges in the electoral process, and which so generally officers the administrative services and the armed forces, it is far from likely to be easy. Nor can we say that the Constitution, when change proposed does not commend itself to this middle class, is really flexible. Moreover, those conven tions which have grown up as an expression of the movement of the Constitution in the direction of democracy often have

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE from such a separation of power are attested by a wide experience, whether it be what is Weimar constitution of Germany, what is federal constitution of America, or what is 1848 constitution of France. Thirdly, what is Constitution is "unwritten," and, fourthly, it is flexible. These two features are often but unjustifiably taken to be interchangeable. There is no codified and basic constitutional law having superior sanctity to other law. General principles are nowhere laid down with institutions to establish their special validity. No revolution has occurred to render necessary a thorough overhauling of what is political system in all its intricacies and a co-ordination in what is light of fixed principles, but change has been piecemeal and gradual, and it is found expressed in new customs or conventions as well as in ordinary statutes. There is therefore, it is argued, a facility of reform, an adaptability, superior to more rigid written constitutions which have been created in one general act. Constitutional change in England is as easy, or as difficult, as any other political change. How easy must depend on what is general nature of what is political system. If reform conflicts with what is views of what is House of Lords, or even of what is King, it is subject to delays and special obstacles. If it conflicts with what is interests of that section of what is community which, as is suggested below, so largely controls what is Press, what is Church, and other organs of opinion, which has special privileges in what is electoral process, and which so generally officers what is administrative services and what is armed forces, it is far from likely to be easy. Nor can we say that what is Constitution, when change proposed does not commend itself to this middle class, is really flexible. Moreover, those conven tions which have grown up as an expression of what is movement of what is Constitution in what is direction of democracy often have where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 22 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" from such a separation of power are attested by a wide experience, whether it be what is Weimar constitution of Germany, what is federal constitution of America, or what is 1848 constitution of France. Thirdly, what is Constitution is "unwritten," and, fourthly, it is flexible. These two features are often but unjustifiably taken to be interchangeable. There is no codified and basic constitutional law having superior sanctity to other law. General principles are nowhere laid down with institutions to establish their special validity. No revolution has occurred to render necessary a thorough overhauling of what is political system in all its intricacies and a co-ordination in what is light of fixed principles, but change has been piecemeal and gradual, and it is found expressed in new customs or conventions as well as in ordinary statutes. There is therefore, it is argued, a facility of reform, an adaptability, superior to more rigid written constitutions which have been created in one general act. Constitutional change in England is as easy, or as difficult, as any other political change. How easy must depend on what is general nature of what is political system. If reform conflicts with what is views of what is House of Lords, or even of what is King, it is subject to delays and special obstacles. If it conflicts with the interests of that section of what is community which, as is suggested below, so largely controls what is Press, what is Church, and other organs of opinion, which has special privileges in what is electoral process, and which so generally officers what is administrative services and what is armed forces, it is far from likely to be easy. Nor can we say that the Constitution, when change proposed does not commend itself to this middle class, is really flexible. Moreover, those conven tions which have grown up as an expression of what is movement of what is Constitution in what is direction of democracy often have where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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