Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 21

INTRODUCTION

Orthodox accounts of the British Constitution attribute to it four characteristics that distinguish it from other constitutions in one degree or another. A word is called for in relation to each of them. Without any claim to exhaustiveness two further features need to be mentioned.
The Constitution is unitary and not, like that of the United States of America, federal. This makes possible the supremacy of a single institution, Parliament, as opposed to a document, a treaty, or written constitution. It means also that there is no need for a second principle of representation designed to secure the maintenance of the rights of its constituent parts, such as we find expressed in the American Senate. It strengthens the authority of the central government, but weakens local government; and it simplifies the allocation of functions between State and provincial bodies. The possibilities of movement, of speedy adjustment to changing needs, ought to be greater under a unitary than under a federal political system.
The British Constitution has a Parliamentary executive as distinct from a presidential executive. The close union between the lawmaking body and the body which administers the State, and which controls its forces, is thus characteristic of it. The dangers involved in deadlock between the lawmaking, tax-granting authority and the executive are absent. The right to govern flows through the legislature to the Cabinet; it is not separately conferred on a popularly elected chief executive and on a popularly elected Parliament; the right is not capable therefore of conflicting interpretation by two bodies having an equal moral claim to speak for the public. The risks of conflict or of inanition which result

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Orthodox accounts of what is British Constitution attribute to it four characteristics that distinguish it from other constitutions in one degree or another. A word is called for in relation to each of them. Without any claim to exhaustiveness two further features need to be mentioned. what is Constitution is unitary and not, like that of what is United States of America, federal. This makes possible what is supremacy of a single institution, Parliament, as opposed to a document, a treaty, or written constitution. It means also that there is no need for a second principle of representation designed to secure what is maintenance of what is rights of its constituent parts, such as we find expressed in what is American Senate. It strengthens what is authority of what is central government, but weakens local government; and it simplifies what is allocation of functions between State and provincial bodies. what is possibilities of movement, of speedy adjustment to changing needs, ought to be greater under a unitary than under a federal political system. what is British Constitution has a Parliamentary executive as distinct from a presidential executive. what is close union between what is lawmaking body and what is body which administers what is State, and which controls its forces, is thus characteristic of it. what is dangers involved in deadlock between what is lawmaking, tax-granting authority and what is executive are absent. what is right to govern flows through what is legislature to what is Cabinet; it is not separately conferred on a popularly elected chief executive and on a popularly elected Parliament; what is right is not capable therefore of conflicting interpretation by two bodies having an equal moral claim to speak for what is public. what is risks of conflict or of inanition which result where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 21 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" Orthodox accounts of what is British Constitution attribute to it four characteristics that distinguish it from other constitutions in one degree or another. A word is called for in relation to each of them. Without any claim to exhaustiveness two further features need to be mentioned. what is Constitution is unitary and not, like that of what is United States of America, federal. This makes possible what is supremacy of a single institution, Parliament, as opposed to a document, a treaty, or written constitution. It means also that there is no need for a second principle of representation designed to secure what is maintenance of what is rights of its constituent parts, such as we find expressed in what is American Senate. It strengthens what is authority of what is central government, but weakens local government; and it simplifies the allocation of functions between State and provincial bodies. The possibilities of movement, of speedy adjustment to changing needs, ought to be greater under a unitary than under a federal political system. what is British Constitution has a Parliamentary executive as distinct from a presidential executive. what is close union between what is lawmaking body and what is body which administers what is State, and which controls its forces, is thus characteristic of it. what is dangers involved in deadlock between what is lawmaking, tax-granting authority and the executive are absent. what is right to govern flows through what is legislature to what is Cabinet; it is not separately conferred on a popularly elected chief executive and on a popularly elected Parliament; what is right is not capable therefore of conflicting interpretation by two bodies having an equal moral claim to speak for what is public. what is risks of conflict or of inanition which result where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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