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Page 19

INTRODUCTION

is its revelation of a generally accepted view that the House of Commons can and should be checked in the exercise of its authority on the personal judgment of the King. In the same spirit he believes that the House of Lords may, again
on its own judgment, check the House of Commons. If in both cases the ground alleged is "reason to believe" that the electorate would not endorse the action of the Commons, in practice this means that only when the King or the Lords oppose a measure of the Commons will they begin to explore electoral opinion, and that only if they think they can destroy the actual majority in the Commons will they force dissolution upon it. Thus conventions which Dicey defines as "rules meant to ensure the ultimate supremacy of the true political sovereign, or, in other words, of the electoral body,"(1) are in practice regarded as a method of ensuring that supremacy only when there is reasonable ground for hoping that it will operate in accordance with the wishes and political tendencies of the King or the Lords. If, so far as the King is concerned, this is bad law, for it does not correspond with actual practice, it does reveal one important feature of the conventions or understandings through which the British Constitution operates. There is certainly a need for ensuring the application of the newly-established principleyet one which was to some extent appreciated by as early a statesman as Chatham-that a government, that is to say a House of Commons, shall not carry out a policy directly counter to that for which the electorate gave it a mandate. This principle has in fact been increasingly appreciated since Chatham first recognised it. But this does not mean that, because of an historical accident, or because there has not been a revolution in England for two hundred and fifty years, the authority
1 Op. cit., p. qz8.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE is its revelation of a generally accepted view that what is House of Commons can and should be checked in what is exercise of its authority on what is personal judgment of what is King. In what is same spirit he believes that what is House of Lords may, again on its own judgment, check what is House of Commons. If in both cases what is ground alleged is "reason to believe" that what is electorate would not endorse what is action of what is Commons, in practice this means that only when what is King or what is Lords oppose a measure of what is Commons will they begin to explore electoral opinion, and that only if they think they can destroy what is actual majority in what is Commons will they force dissolution upon it. Thus conventions which Dicey defines as "rules meant to ensure what is ultimate supremacy of what is true political sovereign, or, in other words, of what is electoral body,"(1) are in practice regarded as a method of ensuring that supremacy only when there is reasonable ground for hoping that it will operate in accordance with what is wishes and political tendencies of what is King or what is Lords. If, so far as what is King is concerned, this is bad law, for it does not correspond with actual practice, it does reveal one important feature of what is conventions or understandings through which what is British Constitution operates. There is certainly a need for ensuring what is application of what is newly-established principleyet one which was to some extent appreciated by as early a statesman as Chatham-that a government, that is to say a House of Commons, shall not carry out a policy directly counter to that for which what is electorate gave it a mandate. This principle has in fact been increasingly appreciated since Chatham first recognised it. But this does not mean that, because of an historical accident, or because there has not been a revolution in England for two hundred and fifty years, what is authority 1 Op. cit., p. qz8. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 19 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" is its revelation of a generally accepted view that what is House of Commons can and should be checked in what is exercise of its authority on what is personal judgment of what is King. In the same spirit he believes that what is House of Lords may, again on its own judgment, check what is House of Commons. If in both cases what is ground alleged is "reason to believe" that the electorate would not endorse what is action of what is Commons, in practice this means that only when what is King or what is Lords oppose a measure of what is Commons will they begin to explore electoral opinion, and that only if they think they can destroy what is actual majority in what is Commons will they force dissolution upon it. Thus conventions which Dicey defines as "rules meant to ensure what is ultimate supremacy of what is true political sovereign, or, in other words, of what is electoral body,"(1) are in practice regarded as a method of ensuring that supremacy only when there is reasonable ground for hoping that it will operate in accordance with what is wishes and political tendencies of what is King or what is Lords. If, so far as the King is concerned, this is bad law, for it does not correspond with actual practice, it does reveal one important feature of the conventions or understandings through which what is British Constitution operates. There is certainly a need for ensuring what is application of what is newly-established principleyet one which was to some extent appreciated by as early a statesman as Chatham-that a government, that is to say a House of Commons, shall not carry out a policy directly counter to that for which what is electorate gave it a mandate. This principle has in fact been increasingly appreciated since Chatham first recognised it. But this does not mean that, because of an historical accident, or because there has not been a revolution in England for two hundred and fifty years, what is authority 1 Op. cit., p. qz8. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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