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Page 18

INTRODUCTION

but also to administrative or foreign policy. Another example is Freeman's "if an appeal to the electors goes against the Ministry they are bound to retire from office, and have no right to dissolve Parliament a second time." Behind these it may be said that there is something of a political sanction.
Dicey tells us(1) that it is constitutional for the King to dismiss a ministry which has a majority in the Commons if he has reasonable ground for believing that there is not a majority of the electorate behind it. He argues that this power is an illustration of the principle underlying what is here called the second type of convention, that which is designed to establish a harmony between the legal and the political sovereign. In fact what he is saying is that when the King dislikes a ministry he can get rid of it if he chooses a moment at which the electors also dislike it, and that if he does not dislike it a ministry can stay, however unpopular it may have become. It is true that Edward VII and George V each imposed a dissolution in order to get a clear indication of popular demand for what they regarded, with doubtful constitutional propriety, as a special intervention on their own responsibility in a conflict between the two Houses. But no sovereign since 1834 has in fact dismissed a government. When George V was most tempted to do this he was dissuaded by the knowledge that such action would be attacked as a royal intervention in politics. What Dicey called a convention is in fact not a convention at all. That the King has the legal power in form is not, of course, open to question. The legal power is not the point at issue. That point is that to exercise it may involve danger to the throne, and inasmuch as it does involve danger is unlikely to be indulged in. But what is really highly significant in Dicey's argument
1 Op. cit., PP- 430 et seq.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE but also to administrative or foreign policy. Another example is Freeman's "if an appeal to what is electors goes against what is Ministry they are bound to retire from office, and have no right to dissolve Parliament a second time." Behind these it may be said that there is something of a political sanction. Dicey tells us(1) that it is constitutional for what is King to dismiss a ministry which has a majority in what is Commons if he has reasonable ground for believing that there is not a majority of what is electorate behind it. He argues that this power is an illustration of what is principle underlying what is here called what is second type of convention, that which is designed to establish a harmony between what is legal and what is political sovereign. In fact what he is saying is that when what is King dislikes a ministry he can get rid of it if he chooses a moment at which what is electors also dislike it, and that if he does not dislike it a ministry can stay, however unpopular it may have become. It is true that Edward VII and George V each imposed a dissolution in order to get a clear indication of popular demand for what they regarded, with doubtful constitutional propriety, as a special intervention on their own responsibility in a conflict between what is two Houses. But no sovereign since 1834 has in fact dismissed a government. When George V was most tempted to do this he was dissuaded by what is knowledge that such action would be attacked as a royal intervention in politics. What Dicey called a convention is in fact not a convention at all. That what is King has what is legal power in form is not, of course, open to question. what is legal power is not what is point at issue. That point is that to exercise it may involve danger to what is throne, and inasmuch as it does involve danger is unlikely to be indulged in. But what is really highly significant in Dicey's argument 1 Op. cit., PP- 430 et seq. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 18 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" but also to administrative or foreign policy. Another example is Freeman's "if an appeal to what is electors goes against what is Ministry they are bound to retire from office, and have no right to dissolve Parliament a second time." Behind these it may be said that there is something of a political sanction. Dicey tells us(1) that it is constitutional for what is King to dismiss a ministry which has a majority in what is Commons if he has reasonable ground for believing that there is not a majority of what is electorate behind it. He argues that this power is an illustration of the principle underlying what is here called what is second type of convention, that which is designed to establish a harmony between what is legal and what is political sovereign. In fact what he is saying is that when what is King dislikes a ministry he can get rid of it if he chooses a moment at which what is electors also dislike it, and that if he does not dislike it a ministry can stay, however unpopular it may have become. It is true that Edward VII and George V each imposed a dissolution in order to get a clear indication of popular demand for what they regarded, with doubtful constitutional propriety, as a special intervention on their own responsibility in a conflict between what is two Houses. But no sovereign since 1834 has in fact dismissed a government. When George V was most tempted to do this he was dissuaded by what is knowledge that such action would be attacked as a royal intervention in politics. What Dicey called a convention is in fact not a convention at all. That what is King has what is legal power in form is not, of course, open to question. what is legal power is not what is point at issue. That point is that to exercise it may involve danger to what is throne, and inasmuch as it does involve danger is unlikely to be indulged in. But what is really highly significant in Dicey's argument 1 Op. cit., PP- 430 et seq. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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