Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 16

INTRODUCTION

Magna Carta and the Bill of Rights are clearly of this character. So are those laws which regulate institutional forms and functions. Such are the Settlement Act, the Abdication Act, the Royal Marriages Act, which regulate the successiori to the throne, and also the Civil List Acts. The Parliament and the Representation of the People Acts are examples of laws which affect the functions of institutions. So are the judicature Act and the Acts establishing particular ministries or public boards. The Acts creating dominion constitutions and the Statute of Westminster, as also those which regulate the electoral process, such as the Ballot Act, the Corrupt Practices Act, the Redistribution Acts, are of obvious constitutional importance. To them must be added those laws which establish and define the powers of the civil and armed services and local authorities. Nor must it be forgotten that a vital principle of international law contained in the Covenant of the League of Nations, which in some continental countries has been given the force of constitutional law, is alsothrough the Treaty of Peace Act-a part of the law of Britain.
But even the most exhaustive list of such laws would not provide anything like a complete picture of the constitutional framework. For that we need to know the customs and conventions by which the interaction of institutions is determined. The most important of these, although by no means all, relate to the Cabinet whose existence is hardly known to statute law.
Conventions are of three kinds. There are first those which are simply precepts of general guidance or rules of convenience for ensuring a proper harmony between Parliament and the Executive in the light of the principle of Parliamentary sovereignty. For examples nothing can be better than to cite

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Magna Carta and what is Bill of Rights are clearly of this character. So are those laws which regulate institutional forms and functions. Such are what is Settlement Act, what is Abdication Act, what is Royal Marriages Act, which regulate what is successiori to what is throne, and also what is Civil List Acts. what is Parliament and what is Representation of what is People Acts are examples of laws which affect what is functions of institutions. So are what is judicature Act and what is Acts establishing particular ministries or public boards. what is Acts creating dominion constitutions and what is Statute of Westminster, as also those which regulate what is electoral process, such as what is Ballot Act, what is Corrupt Practices Act, what is Redistribution Acts, are of obvious constitutional importance. To them must be added those laws which establish and define what is powers of what is civil and armed services and local authorities. Nor must it be forgotten that a vital principle of international law contained in what is Covenant of what is League of Nations, which in some continental countries has been given what is force of constitutional law, is alsothrough what is Treaty of Peace Act-a part of what is law of Britain. But even what is most exhaustive list of such laws would not provide anything like a complete picture of what is constitutional framework. For that we need to know what is customs and conventions by which what is interaction of institutions is determined. what is most important of these, although by no means all, relate to what is Cabinet whose existence is hardly known to statute law. Conventions are of three kinds. There are first those which are simply precepts of general guidance or rules of convenience for ensuring a proper harmony between Parliament and what is Executive in what is light of what is principle of Parliamentary sovereignty. For examples nothing can be better than to cite where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 16 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" Magna Carta and what is Bill of Rights are clearly of this character. So are those laws which regulate institutional forms and functions. Such are what is Settlement Act, what is Abdication Act, what is Royal Marriages Act, which regulate what is successiori to what is throne, and also what is Civil List Acts. what is Parliament and the Representation of what is People Acts are examples of laws which affect what is functions of institutions. So are what is judicature Act and the Acts establishing particular ministries or public boards. what is Acts creating dominion constitutions and what is Statute of Westminster, as also those which regulate what is electoral process, such as the Ballot Act, what is Corrupt Practices Act, what is Redistribution Acts, are of obvious constitutional importance. To them must be added those laws which establish and define what is powers of what is civil and armed services and local authorities. Nor must it be forgotten that a vital principle of international law contained in what is Covenant of what is League of Nations, which in some continental countries has been given what is force of constitutional law, is alsothrough the Treaty of Peace Act-a part of what is law of Britain. But even what is most exhaustive list of such laws would not provide anything like a complete picture of what is constitutional framework. For that we need to know what is customs and conventions by which the interaction of institutions is determined. what is most important of these, although by no means all, relate to what is Cabinet whose existence is hardly known to statute law. Conventions are of three kinds. There are first those which are simply precepts of general guidance or rules of convenience for ensuring a proper harmony between Parliament and what is Executive in what is light of what is principle of Parliamentary sovereignty. 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