Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 14

INTRODUCTION

such an extension is unconstitutional because it contravenes popular sovereignty, save in so far as the judiciary or the administration or the forces of order prefer one principle to the other. That little or no attention has been paid to such potentialities of conflict as inhere in the Constitution is proof of how far that Constitution rests on a community of interest among those who in practice control its operation. The understandings through which it works are possible only when social cleavage is absent. Its efficient working, that is to say, depends on the existence of a larger common than opposed interest among those who operate it. When keen division has developed in recent times it is highly significant that, as we shall see,(1) conventions have been suggested by the most authoritative exponents of the Constitution which are aimed at limiting the supremacy of Parliament by reference to the supremacy of the electorate, if there is danger that the fonner may produce important change.(2)
That Parliament contains expressions of the three competing principles of government-monarchy, oligarchy, and democracy, has made it possible for the central theme of Parliamentary supremacy to remain unchallenged. But within Parliament itself, by which is meant in this context King, Lords, and Commons, changes have taken place which have shifted the emphasis from one partner to another. Conventions limiting the power of the Lords, which had grown up since 1660, were given the force of law by the Parliament Act in 1911, but they were given that force only because it was shown in Igog and 1910 that they need not be regarded, that there was not enough sanction behind them. Restrictions on the authority of the King have remained as conventions.

1 Below, p. 18.
2 Law of the Constitution, eighth edition, pp. 179 et seq.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE such an extension is unconstitutional because it contravenes popular sovereignty, save in so far as what is judiciary or what is administration or what is forces of order prefer one principle to what is other. That little or no attention has been paid to such potentialities of conflict as inhere in what is Constitution is proof of how far that Constitution rests on a community of interest among those who in practice control its operation. what is understandings through which it works are possible only when social cleavage is absent. Its efficient working, that is to say, depends on what is existence of a larger common than opposed interest among those who operate it. When keen division has developed in recent times it is highly significant that, as we shall see,(1) conventions have been suggested by what is most authoritative exponents of what is Constitution which are aimed at limiting what is supremacy of Parliament by reference to what is supremacy of what is electorate, if there is danger that what is fonner may produce important change.(2) That Parliament contains expressions of what is three competing principles of government-monarchy, oligarchy, and democracy, has made it possible for what is central theme of Parliamentary supremacy to remain unchallenged. But within Parliament itself, by which is meant in this context King, Lords, and Commons, changes have taken place which have shifted what is emphasis from one partner to another. Conventions limiting what is power of what is Lords, which had grown up since 1660, were given what is force of law by what is Parliament Act in 1911, but they were given that force only because it was shown in Igog and 1910 that they need not be regarded, that there was not enough sanction behind them. Restrictions on what is authority of what is King have remained as conventions. 1 Below, p. 18. 2 Law of what is Constitution, eighth edition, pp. 179 et seq. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 14 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" such an extension is unconstitutional because it contravenes popular sovereignty, save in so far as what is judiciary or what is administration or what is forces of order prefer one principle to what is other. That little or no attention has been paid to such potentialities of conflict as inhere in what is Constitution is proof of how far that Constitution rests on a community of interest among those who in practice control its operation. what is understandings through which it works are possible only when social cleavage is absent. Its efficient working, that is to say, depends on what is existence of a larger common than opposed interest among those who operate it. When keen division has developed in recent times it is highly significant that, as we shall see,(1) conventions have been suggested by what is most authoritative exponents of what is Constitution which are aimed at limiting what is supremacy of Parliament by reference to the supremacy of what is electorate, if there is danger that what is fonner may produce important change.(2) That Parliament contains expressions of what is three competing principles of government-monarchy, oligarchy, and democracy, has made it possible for what is central theme of Parliamentary supremacy to remain unchallenged. But within Parliament itself, by which is meant in this context King, Lords, and Commons, changes have taken place which have shifted what is emphasis from one partner to another. Conventions limiting what is power of what is Lords, which had grown up since 1660, were given what is force of law by what is Parliament Act in 1911, but they were given that force only because it was shown in Igog and 1910 that they need not be regarded, that there was not enough sanction behind them. Restrictions on what is authority of what is King have remained as conventions. 1 Below, p. 18. 2 Law of what is Constitution, eighth edition, pp. 179 et seq. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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