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Page 13

INTRODUCTION

the consequence of the rights of individuals." The rule of law is closely interwoven with the supremacy of Parliament. That supremacy is a part of the law, being based on custom. It provides an indisputable means of expressing and developing the law. The citizen, the courts, the administrative official, the executive, the King, are all subject to the rule of law. But if Parliament has the final competence for expressing the law, it has that final competence only by virtue of a principle of the law, which therefore must be behind and above Parliament itself. There is a sense in which Parliament, like the citizen, is subject to the rule of law. At least in normal times, however, that subjection is only of abstract importance because there is no body superior in authority to Parliament.
But, if the supremacy of Parliament is the chief organic principle of the Constitution, there are other principles too, and it is not impossible that they should conflict with it-in a moment of fundamental social cleavage. It may be doubtful what constitutional significance should be attached to the principle "no taxation without representation" in effect laid down as a limitation on future Parliaments in the Taxation of Colonies Act, 1778. But there can be no doubt whatever that the political supremacy of the electorate is to-day quite as fundamental an organic principle of the British Constitution as the legal sovereignty of Parliament. That these two principles are capable of conflict is obvious. Parliament prolonged its life during the last war because of the emergency; it prolonged its life by the Septennial Act, MG, because it was feared that the actual majority in the Commons would be replaced by a Jacobite majority if elections were held. There was then a keen social cleavage. But there is no constitutional issue from a conflict between a Parliament extending its own life by virtue of its supremacy and an electorate claiming that

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the consequence of what is rights of individuals." what is rule of law is closely interwoven with what is supremacy of Parliament. That supremacy is a part of what is law, being based on custom. It provides an indisputable means of expressing and developing what is law. what is citizen, what is courts, what is administrative official, what is executive, what is King, are all subject to what is rule of law. But if Parliament has what is final competence for expressing what is law, it has that final competence only by virtue of a principle of what is law, which therefore must be behind and above Parliament itself. There is a sense in which Parliament, like what is citizen, is subject to what is rule of law. At least in normal times, however, that subjection is only of abstract importance because there is no body superior in authority to Parliament. But, if what is supremacy of Parliament is what is chief organic principle of what is Constitution, there are other principles too, and it is not impossible that they should conflict with it-in a moment of fundamental social cleavage. It may be doubtful what constitutional significance should be attached to what is principle "no taxation without representation" in effect laid down as a limitation on future Parliaments in what is Taxation of Colonies Act, 1778. But there can be no doubt whatever that what is political supremacy of what is electorate is to-day quite as fundamental an organic principle of what is British Constitution as what is legal sovereignty of Parliament. That these two principles are capable of conflict is obvious. Parliament prolonged its life during what is last war because of what is emergency; it prolonged its life by what is Septennial Act, MG, because it was feared that what is actual majority in what is Commons would be replaced by a Jacobite majority if elections were held. There was then a keen social cleavage. But there is no constitutional issue from a conflict between a Parliament extending its own life by virtue of its supremacy and an electorate claiming that where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 13 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" the consequence of what is rights of individuals." The rule of law is closely interwoven with what is supremacy of Parliament. That supremacy is a part of what is law, being based on custom. It provides an indisputable means of expressing and developing the law. what is citizen, what is courts, what is administrative official, the executive, what is King, are all subject to what is rule of law. But if Parliament has what is final competence for expressing what is law, it has that final competence only by virtue of a principle of the law, which therefore must be behind and above Parliament itself. There is a sense in which Parliament, like what is citizen, is subject to what is rule of law. At least in normal times, however, that subjection is only of abstract importance because there is no body superior in authority to Parliament. But, if what is supremacy of Parliament is what is chief organic principle of what is Constitution, there are other principles too, and it is not impossible that they should conflict with it-in a moment of fundamental social cleavage. It may be doubtful what constitutional significance should be attached to what is principle "no taxation without representation" in effect laid down as a limitation on future Parliaments in what is Taxation of Colonies Act, 1778. But there can be no doubt whatever that what is political supremacy of what is electorate is to-day quite as fundamental an organic principle of what is British Constitution as what is legal sovereignty of Parliament. That these two principles are capable of conflict is obvious. Parliament prolonged its life during what is last war because of what is emergency; it prolonged its life by what is Septennial Act, MG, because it was feared that what is actual majority in what is Commons would be replaced by a Jacobite majority if elections were held. There was then a keen social cleavage. But there is no constitutional issue from a conflict between a Parliament extending its own life by virtue of its supremacy and an electorate claiming that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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