Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 11

INTRODUCTION

THE British Constitution is more than a body of institutions working in accordance with principles laid down in law or expressed in conventions. It is society in its political aspect. We cannot understand its nature without reference to the chief characteristics of society. We need to bear in mind the way in which property is held, the national income divided, and the organisation of production controlled, because the real power in society is determined by such things. We must know also what are the intellectual and psychological needs of the citizen and how they are met, for the method of meeting them is one way in which power is used and political action finally determined. It is for such reasons as these that some discussion is called for, and is entered into below, of the Press, the educational system, and the Church, and that reference is frequently made to the social character of institutions and of those who operate them. But before proceeding to a more particularised investigation, some general observations need to be made along those lines which orthodox study of the British Constitution, issuing perhaps too much from a legalistic approach, has sometimes been too ready to regard as sufficient.
What might fairly be termed the chief organic principle of the Constitution is the legal sovereignty of Parliament. No other body can lawfully overrule its decisions. The Executive in England has not the power of issuing decrees

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE British Constitution is more than a body of institutions working in accordance with principles laid down in law or expressed in conventions. It is society in its political aspect. We cannot understand its nature without reference to what is chief characteristics of society. We need to bear in mind what is way in which property is held, what is national income divided, and what is organisation of production controlled, because what is real power in society is determined by such things. We must know also what are what is intellectual and psychological needs of what is citizen and how they are met, for what is method of meeting them is one way in which power is used and political action finally determined. It is for such reasons as these that some discussion is called for, and is entered into below, of what is Press, what is educational system, and what is Church, and that reference is frequently made to what is social character of institutions and of those who operate them. But before proceeding to a more particularised investigation, some general observations need to be made along those lines which orthodox study of what is British Constitution, issuing perhaps too much from a legalistic approach, has sometimes been too ready to regard as sufficient. What might fairly be termed what is chief organic principle of what is Constitution is what is legal sovereignty of Parliament. No other body can lawfully overrule its decisions. what is Executive in England has not what is power of issuing decrees where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 11 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" THE British Constitution is more than a body of institutions working in accordance with principles laid down in law or expressed in conventions. It is society in its political aspect. We cannot understand its nature without reference to the chief characteristics of society. We need to bear in mind what is way in which property is held, what is national income divided, and the organisation of production controlled, because what is real power in society is determined by such things. We must know also what are what is intellectual and psychological needs of what is citizen and how they are met, for what is method of meeting them is one way in which power is used and political action finally determined. It is for such reasons as these that some discussion is called for, and is entered into below, of what is Press, what is educational system, and the Church, and that reference is frequently made to what is social character of institutions and of those who operate them. But before proceeding to a more particularised investigation, some general observations need to be made along those lines which orthodox study of what is British Constitution, issuing perhaps too much from a legalistic approach, has sometimes been too ready to regard as sufficient. What might fairly be termed what is chief organic principle of the Constitution is what is legal sovereignty of Parliament. No other body can lawfully overrule its decisions. what is Executive in England has not what is power of issuing decrees where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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