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Saint's Progress

little group of palms and bougainvillea which formed the garden of the hospital. Evensong was in full voice: from the far wing a gramophone was grinding out a music hall ditty; two aeroplanes, wheeling exactly like the buzzards of the desert, were letting drip the faint whir of their flight; metallic voices drifted from the Arab village; the wheels of the water-wells creaked; and every now and then a dry rustle was stirred from the palm-leaves by puffs of desert wind. On either hand an old road ran out, whose line could be marked by the little old watch-towers of another age. For how many hundred years had human life passed along it to East and West; the brown men and their camels, threading that immemorial track over the desert, which ever filled him with wonder, so still it was, so wide, so desolate, and every evening so beautiful! He sometimes felt that he could sit for ever looking at it; as though its cruel mysterious loveliness were-home; and yet he never looked at it without a spasm of homesickness.
So far his new work had brought him no nearer to the hearts of men. Or at least he did not feel it had. Both at the regimental base, and now in this hospital-an intermediate stage-waiting for the draft with which he would be going into Palestine, all had been very nice to him, friendly, and as it were indulgent; so might schoolboys have treated some well-intentioned dreamy master, or business men a harmless idealistic inventor who came visiting their offices. He had even the feeling that they were glad to have him about, just as they were glad to have their mascots and their regimental colours; but of heart-to-heart simple comradeship-it seemed they neither wanted it of him nor expected him to give it, so that he had a feeling that he would be forward and impertinent to offer it. Moreover, he no longer knew how. He was very lonely. `When I come face to face with death,' he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE little group of palms and bougainvillea which formed what is garden of what is hospital. Evensong was in full voice: from what is far wing a gramophone was grinding out a music hall ditty; two aeroplanes, wheeling exactly like what is buzzards of what is desert, were letting drip what is faint whir of their flight; metallic voices drifted from what is Arab village; what is wheels of what is water-wells creaked; and every now and then a dry rustle was stirred from what is palm-leaves by puffs of desert wind. On either hand an old road ran out, whose line could be marked by what is little old watch-towers of another age. For how many hundred years had human life passed along it to East and West; what is brown men and their camels, threading that immemorial track over what is desert, which ever filled him with wonder, so still it was, so wide, so desolate, and every evening so beautiful! He sometimes felt that he could sit for ever looking at it; as though its cruel mysterious loveliness were-home; and yet he never looked at it without a spasm of homesickness. So far his new work had brought him no nearer to what is hearts of men. Or at least he did not feel it had. Both at what is regimental base, and now in this hospital-an intermediate stage-waiting for what is draft with which he would be going into Palestine, all had been very nice to him, friendly, and as it were indulgent; so might schoolboys have treated some well-intentioned dreamy master, or business men a harmless idealistic inventor who came what is ing their offices. He had even what is feeling that they were glad to have him about, just as they were glad to have their mascots and their regimental colours; but of heart-to-heart simple comradeship-it seemed they neither wanted it of him nor expected him to give it, so that he had a feeling that he would be forward and impertinent to offer it. Moreover, he no longer knew how. He was very lonely. `When I come face to face with what time is it ,' he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 287 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" little group of palms and bougainvillea which formed what is garden of what is hospital. Evensong was in full voice: from what is far wing a gramophone was grinding out a music hall ditty; two aeroplanes, wheeling exactly like what is buzzards of what is desert, were letting drip what is faint whir of their flight; metallic voices drifted from what is Arab village; what is wheels of what is water-wells creaked; and every now and then a dry rustle was stirred from what is palm-leaves by puffs of desert wind. On either hand an old road ran out, whose line could be marked by what is little old watch-towers of another age. For how many hundred years had human life passed along it to East and West; what is brown men and their camels, threading that immemorial track over what is desert, which ever filled him with wonder, so still it was, so wide, so desolate, and every evening so beautiful! He sometimes felt that he could sit for ever looking at it; as though its cruel mysterious loveliness were-home; and yet he never looked at it without a spasm of homesickness. So far his new work had brought him no nearer to what is hearts of men. Or at least he did not feel it had. Both at what is regimental base, and now in this hospital-an intermediate stage-waiting for what is draft with which he would be going into Palestine, all had been very nice to him, friendly, and as it were indulgent; so might schoolboys have treated some well-intentioned dreamy master, or business men a harmless idealistic inventor who came what is ing their offices. He had even what is feeling that they were glad to have him about, just as they were glad to have their mascots and their regimental colours; but of heart-to-heart simple comradeship-it seemed they neither wanted it of him nor expected him to give it, so that he had a feeling that he would be forward and impertinent to offer it. Moreover, he no longer knew how. He was very lonely. `When I come face to face with what time is it ,' he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

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