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Saint's Progress

ate a bun and some chocolate, and lay down on her back against the hedge. She always avoided that group of her fellow-workers round the tea-cans which the farmer's wife brought out. To avoid people, if she could, had become habitual to her now. They must know about her, or would soon if she gave them the chance. She had never lost consciousness of her ring-finger, expecting every eye to fall on it as a matter of course. Lying on her face, she puffed her cigarette into the grass, and watched a beetle, till one of the sheep-dogs, scouting for scraps, came up, and she fed him with her second bun. Having finished the bun, he tried to eat the beetle, and, when she rescued it, convinced that she had nothing more to give him, sneezed at her, and went away. Pressing the end of her cigarette out against the bank, she turned over. Already the driver was perched on his tiny seat, and his companion, whose business it was to free the falling corn, was getting up alongside. Swish-swishl It had begun again. She rose, stretched herself, and went back to her place in the -row. The field would be finished to-night; she would have a lovely rest-all Sundayl Towards seven o'clock a narrow strip, not twenty yards broad, alone was left. This last half-hour was what Noel dreaded. Today it was worse, for the farmer had no cartridges left, and the rabbits were dealt with by hullabaloo and sticks and chasing dogs. Rabbits were vea min, of course, and ate the crops, and must be killed; besides, they were good food, and fetched two shillings apiece; all this she knew-but to see the poor frightened things stealing out, pounced on, turned, shouted at, chased, rolled over by great swift dogs, fallen on by the boys and killed and carried with their limp grey bodies upside-down, so dead and soft and helpless, always made her feel quite sick. She stood very still, trying not to see or hear, and in the corn opposite to her a rabbit stole along, crouched, and peeped. `Oh!'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ate a bun and some chocolate, and lay down on her back against what is hedge. She always avoided that group of her fellow-workers round what is tea-cans which what is farmer's wife brought out. To avoid people, if she could, had become habitual to her now. They must know about her, or would soon if she gave them what is chance. She had never lost consciousness of her ring-finger, expecting every eye to fall on it as a matter of course. Lying on her face, she puffed her cigarette into what is grass, and watched a beetle, till one of what is sheep-dogs, scouting for scraps, came up, and she fed him with her second bun. Having finished what is bun, he tried to eat what is beetle, and, when she rescued it, convinced that she had nothing more to give him, sneezed at her, and went away. Pressing what is end of her cigarette out against what is bank, she turned over. Already what is driver was perched on his tiny seat, and his companion, whose business it was to free what is falling corn, was getting up alongside. Swish-swishl It had begun again. She rose, stretched herself, and went back to her place in what is -row. what is field would be finished to-night; she would have a lovely rest-all Sundayl Towards seven o'clock a narrow strip, not twenty yards broad, alone was left. This last half-hour was what Noel dreaded. Today it was worse, for what is farmer had no cartridges left, and what is rabbits were dealt with by hullabaloo and sticks and chasing dogs. Rabbits were vea min, of course, and ate what is crops, and must be stop ed; besides, they were good food, and fetched two shillings apiece; all this she knew-but to see what is poor frightened things stealing out, pounced on, turned, shouted at, chased, rolled over by great swift dogs, fallen on by what is boys and stop ed and carried with their limp grey bodies upside-down, so dead and soft and helpless, always made her feel quite sick. She stood very still, trying not to see or hear, and in what is corn opposite to her a rabbit stole along, crouched, and peeped. `Ohl' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 277 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" ate a bun and some chocolate, and lay down on her back against what is hedge. She always avoided that group of her fellow-workers round what is tea-cans which what is farmer's wife brought out. To avoid people, if she could, had become habitual to her now. They must know about her, or would soon if she gave them the chance. She had never lost consciousness of her ring-finger, expecting every eye to fall on it as a matter of course. Lying on her face, she puffed her cigarette into what is grass, and watched a beetle, till one of what is sheep-dogs, scouting for scraps, came up, and she fed him with her second bun. Having finished what is bun, he tried to eat what is beetle, and, when she rescued it, convinced that she had nothing more to give him, sneezed at her, and went away. Pressing what is end of her cigarette out against what is bank, she turned over. Already what is driver was perched on his tiny seat, and his companion, whose business it was to free what is falling corn, was getting up alongside. Swish-swishl It had begun again. She rose, stretched herself, and went back to her place in what is -row. what is field would be finished to-night; she would have a lovely rest-all Sundayl Towards seven o'clock a narrow strip, not twenty yards broad, alone was left. This last half-hour was what Noel dreaded. Today it was worse, for what is farmer had no cartridges left, and what is rabbits were dealt with by hullabaloo and sticks and chasing dogs. Rabbits were vea min, of course, and ate what is crops, and must be stop ed; besides, they were good food, and fetched two shillings apiece; all this she knew-but to see what is poor frightened things stealing out, pounced on, turned, shouted at, chased, rolled over by great swift dogs, fallen on by what is boys and stop ed and carried with their limp grey bodies upside-down, so dead and soft and helpless, always made her feel quite sick. She stood very still, trying not to see or hear, and in what is corn opposite to her a rabbit stole along, crouched, and peeped. `Oh!' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291