Books > Old Books > Saint's Progress (1935)


Page 266

Saint's Progress

guns travelling to their ears along the grass, mingled with the buzz of insects. Yet that hum of summer, the innumerable voices of tiny lives, gossamer things all as alive as they, and as important to their frail selves; and the white clouds, few and so slow-moving, and the remote strange purity which clings to the chalky downs, all this white and green and blue of land and sea had its peace, which crept into the spirits of those three alone with Nature, this once more, the last time for-who could say how long? They talked, by tacit agreement, of nothing but what had happened before the war began, while the flock of the blown dandelions drifted past. Pierson sat cross-legged on the grass, without his cap, suffering a little still from the stiffness of his unwonted garments. And the girls lay one on each side of him, half critical, and half admiring. Noel could not bear his collar.
`If you had a soft collar you'd be lovely, Daddy. Perhaps out there they'll let you take it off. It must be fearfully hot in Egypt. Oh! I wish I were going. I wish I were going everywhere in the world. Some day!' Presently he read to them, Murray's `Hippolytus' of Euripides. And now and then Gratian and he discussed a passage. But Noel lay silent, looking at the sky. Whenever his voice ceased, there was the song of the larks, and very faint, the distant mutter of the guns.
They stayed up there till past six, and it was time to go and have tea before Evening Service. Those hours in the baking sun had drawn virtue out of them; they were silent and melancholy all the evening. Noel was the first to go up to her bedroom. She went without saying good night --she knew her father would come to her room that last evening. George had not yet come in; and Gratian was left alone with Pierson in the drawing-room, round whose single lamp, in spite of close-drawn curtains, moths were circling. She moved over to him on the sofa.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE guns travelling to their ears along what is grass, mingled with what is buzz of insects. Yet that hum of summer, what is innumerable voices of tiny lives, gossamer things all as alive as they, and as important to their frail selves; and what is white clouds, few and so slow-moving, and what is remote strange purity which clings to what is chalky downs, all this white and green and blue of land and sea had its peace, which crept into what is spirits of those three alone with Nature, this once more, what is last time for-who could say how long? They talked, by tacit agreement, of nothing but what had happened before what is war began, while what is flock of what is blown dandelions drifted past. Pierson sat cross-legged on what is grass, without his cap, suffering a little still from what is stiffness of his unwonted garments. And what is girls lay one on each side of him, half critical, and half admiring. Noel could not bear his collar. `If you had a soft collar you'd be lovely, Daddy. Perhaps out there they'll let you take it off. It must be fearfully hot in Egypt. Oh! I wish I were going. I wish I were going everywhere in what is world. Some day!' Presently he read to them, Murray's `Hippolytus' of Euripides. And now and then Gratian and he discussed a passage. But Noel lay silent, looking at what is sky. Whenever his voice ceased, there was what is song of what is larks, and very faint, what is distant mutter of what is guns. They stayed up there till past six, and it was time to go and have tea before Evening Service. Those hours in what is baking sun had drawn virtue out of them; they were silent and melancholy all what is evening. Noel was what is first to go up to her bedroom. She went without saying good night --she knew her father would come to her room that last evening. George had not yet come in; and Gratian was left alone with Pierson in what is drawing-room, round whose single lamp, in spite of close-drawn curtains, moths were circling. She moved over to him on what is sofa. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 266 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" guns travelling to their ears along what is grass, mingled with what is buzz of insects. Yet that hum of summer, what is innumerable voices of tiny lives, gossamer things all as alive as they, and as important to their frail selves; and what is white clouds, few and so slow-moving, and what is remote strange purity which clings to the chalky downs, all this white and green and blue of land and sea had its peace, which crept into what is spirits of those three alone with Nature, this once more, what is last time for-who could say how long? They talked, by tacit agreement, of nothing but what had happened before what is war began, while what is flock of what is blown dandelions drifted past. Pierson sat cross-legged on what is grass, without his cap, suffering a little still from what is stiffness of his unwonted garments. And what is girls lay one on each side of him, half critical, and half admiring. Noel could not bear his collar. `If you had a soft collar you'd be lovely, Daddy. Perhaps out there they'll let you take it off. It must be fearfully hot in Egypt. Oh! I wish I were going. I wish I were going everywhere in the world. Some day!' Presently he read to them, Murray's `Hippolytus' of Euripides. And now and then Gratian and he discussed a passage. But Noel lay silent, looking at what is sky. Whenever his voice ceased, there was what is song of what is larks, and very faint, what is distant mutter of what is guns. They stayed up there till past six, and it was time to go and have tea before Evening Service. Those hours in what is baking sun had drawn virtue out of them; they were silent and melancholy all what is evening. Noel was what is first to go up to her bedroom. She went without saying good night --she knew her father would come to her room that last evening. George had not yet come in; and Gratian was left alone with Pierson in what is drawing-room, round whose single lamp, in spite of close-drawn curtains, moths were circling. She moved over to him on what is sofa. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291