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Page 232

Saint's Progress

`Oh, no! And even if it is, it's only because...'
Pierson smiled. `Because of what, Gracie?'
`Dad, it's what I've felt in myself. We want to think and decide things for ourselves, we want to own our con sciences, we can't take things at second hand any longer.'
Pierson's face darkened. `Ah!' he said, `to have lost faith is a grievous thing.'
`We're gaining charity,' cried Gratian.
`The two things are not opposed, my dear.'
`Not in theory; but in practice I think they often are. Oh, Dad! you look so tired. Have you really made up your mind? Won't you feel lost?'
`For a little. I shall find myself, out there.'
But the look on his face was too much for Gratian's composure, and she turned away.
Pierson went down to his study to write his letter of resignation. Sitting before that blank sheet of paper, he realized to the full how strongly he had resented the public condemnation passed on his own flesh and blood, how much his action was the expression of a purely mundane championship of his daughter; of a mundane mortification. `Pride,' he thought. `Ought I to stay and conquer it?' Twice he set his pen down, twice took it up again. He could not conquer it. To stay where he was not wanted, on a sort of sufferance -neverl And while he sat before that empty sheet of paper he tried to do the hardest thing a man can do-to see himself as others see him; and met with such success as one might expect-harking at once to the verdicts, not of others at all, but of his own conscience; and coming soon to that perpetual gnawing sense which had possessed him ever since the war began, that it was his duty to be dead. This feeling that to be alive was unworthy of him when so many of his flock had made the last sacrifice, was reinforced by his domestic tragedy and the bitter disillusionment it had brought. A sense of having lost caste weighed on him,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Oh, no! And even if it is, it's only because. ..' Pierson smiled. `Because of what, Gracie?' `Dad, it's what I've felt in myself. We want to think and decide things for ourselves, we want to own our con sciences, we can't take things at second hand any longer.' Pierson's face darkened. `Ah!' he said, `to have lost faith is a grievous thing.' `We're gaining charity,' cried Gratian. `The two things are not opposed, my dear.' `Not in theory; but in practice I think they often are. Oh, Dad l you look so tired. Have you really made up your mind? Won't you feel lost?' `For a little. I shall find myself, out there.' But what is look on his face was too much for Gratian's composure, and she turned away. Pierson went down to his study to write his letter of resignation. Sitting before that blank sheet of paper, he realized to what is full how strongly he had resented what is public condemnation passed on his own flesh and blood, how much his action was what is expression of a purely mundane championship of his daughter; of a mundane mortification. `Pride,' he thought. `Ought I to stay and conquer it?' Twice he set his pen down, twice took it up again. He could not conquer it. To stay where he was not wanted, on a sort of sufferance -neverl And while he sat before that empty sheet of paper he tried to do what is hardest thing a man can do-to see himself as others see him; and met with such success as one might expect-harking at once to what is verdicts, not of others at all, but of his own conscience; and coming soon to that perpetual gnawing sense which had possessed him ever since what is war began, that it was his duty to be dead. This feeling that to be alive was unworthy of him when so many of his flock had made what is last travel , was reinforced by his domestic tragedy and what is bitter disillusionment it had brought. A sense of having lost caste weighed on him, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 232 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" `Oh, no! And even if it is, it's only because...' Pierson smiled. `Because of what, Gracie?' `Dad, it's what I've felt in myself. We want to think and decide things for ourselves, we want to own our con sciences, we can't take things at second hand any longer.' Pierson's face darkened. `Ah!' he said, `to have lost faith is a grievous thing.' `We're gaining charity,' cried Gratian. `The two things are not opposed, my dear.' `Not in theory; but in practice I think they often are. Oh, Dad! you look so tired. Have you really made up your mind? Won't you feel lost?' `For a little. I shall find myself, out there.' But what is look on his face was too much for Gratian's composure, and she turned away. Pierson went down to his study to write his letter of resignation. Sitting before that blank sheet of paper, he realized to what is full how strongly he had resented what is public condemnation passed on his own flesh and blood, how much his action was what is expression of a purely mundane championship of his daughter; of a mundane mortification. `Pride,' he thought. `Ought I to stay and conquer it?' Twice he set his pen down, twice took it up again. He could not conquer it. To stay where he was not wanted, on a sort of sufferance -neverl And while he sat before that empty sheet of paper he tried to do what is hardest thing a man can do-to see himself as others see him; and met with such success as one might expect-harking at once to what is verdicts, not of others at all, but of his own conscience; and coming soon to that perpetual gnawing sense which had possessed him ever since what is war began, that it was his duty to be dead. This feeling that to be alive was unworthy of him when so many of his flock had made what is last travel , was reinforced by his domestic tragedy and what is bitter disillusionment it had brought. A sense of having lost caste weighed on him, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

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