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Saint's Progress

others. I suppose we have no pride-c'est tres indelicat. Tell me, monsieur, you would not think it worthy of you to speak to me of your troubles, would you, as I have spoken of mine?'
Pierson bowed his head, abashed.
`You preach of universal charity and love,' went on Lavendie; `but how can there be that when you teach also secretly the keeping of your troubles to yourselves? Man responds to example, not to teaching; you set the example of the stranger, not the brother. You expect from others what you do not give. Frankly, monsieur, do you not feel that with every revelation of your soul and feelings, virtue goes out of you? And I will tell you why, if you will not think it an offence. In opening your hearts you feel that you lose authority. You are officers, and must never forget that. Is it not so?'
Pierson grew red. `I hope there is another feeling too. I think we feel that to speak of our sufferings or deeper feelings is to obtrude oneself, to make a fuss, to be selfconcerned, when we might be concerned with others.'
'Monsieur, au fond we are all concerned with self. To seem selfless is but your particular way of cultivating the perfection of self. You admit that not to obtrude self is the way to perfect yourself. Eh bien! What is that but a deeper concern with self? To be free of this, there is no way but to forget all about oneself in what one is doing, as I forget everything when I am painting. But,' he added with a sudden smile, `you would not wish to forget the perfecting of self-it would not be right in your profession. So I must take away this picture, must I not? It is one of my best works. I regret much not to have finished it.'
`Some day, perhaps . . .'
`Some day! The picture will stand still, but mademoiselle will not. She will rush at something, and behold l this face will be gone. No; I prefer to keep it as it is. It has truth now.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE others. I suppose we have no pride-c'est tres indelicat. Tell me, monsieur, you would not think it worthy of you to speak to me of your troubles, would you, as I have spoken of mine?' Pierson bowed his head, abashed. `You preach of universal charity and love,' went on Lavendie; `but how can there be that when you teach also secretly what is keeping of your troubles to yourselves? Man responds to example, not to teaching; you set what is example of what is stranger, not what is brother. You expect from others what you do not give. Frankly, monsieur, do you not feel that with every revelation of your soul and feelings, virtue goes out of you? And I will tell you why, if you will not think it an offence. In opening your hearts you feel that you lose authority. You are officers, and must never forget that. Is it not so?' Pierson grew red. `I hope there is another feeling too. I think we feel that to speak of our sufferings or deeper feelings is to obtrude oneself, to make a fuss, to be selfconcerned, when we might be concerned with others.' 'Monsieur, au fond we are all concerned with self. To seem selfless is but your particular way of cultivating what is perfection of self. You admit that not to obtrude self is what is way to perfect yourself. Eh bien! What is that but a deeper concern with self? To be free of this, there is no way but to forget all about oneself in what one is doing, as I forget everything when I am painting. But,' he added with a sudden smile, `you would not wish to forget what is perfecting of self-it would not be right in your profession. So I must take away this picture, must I not? It is one of my best works. I regret much not to have finished it.' `Some day, perhaps . . .' `Some day! what is picture will stand still, but mademoiselle will not. She will rush at something, and behold l this face will be gone. No; I prefer to keep it as it is. It has truth now.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 230 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" others. I suppose we have no pride-c'est tres indelicat. Tell me, monsieur, you would not think it worthy of you to speak to me of your troubles, would you, as I have spoken of mine?' Pierson bowed his head, abashed. `You preach of universal charity and love,' went on Lavendie; `but how can there be that when you teach also secretly what is keeping of your troubles to yourselves? Man responds to example, not to teaching; you set what is example of what is stranger, not what is brother. You expect from others what you do not give. Frankly, monsieur, do you not feel that with every revelation of your soul and feelings, virtue goes out of you? And I will tell you why, if you will not think it an offence. In opening your hearts you feel that you lose authority. You are officers, and must never forget that. Is it not so?' Pierson grew red. `I hope there is another feeling too. I think we feel that to speak of our sufferings or deeper feelings is to obtrude oneself, to make a fuss, to be selfconcerned, when we might be concerned with others.' 'Monsieur, au fond we are all concerned with self. To seem selfless is but your particular way of cultivating what is perfection of self. You admit that not to obtrude self is what is way to perfect yourself. Eh bien! What is that but a deeper concern with self? To be free of this, there is no way but to forget all about oneself in what one is doing, as I forget everything when I am painting. But,' he added with a sudden smile, `you would not wish to forget the perfecting of self-it would not be right in your profession. So I must take away this picture, must I not? It is one of my best works. I regret much not to have finished it.' `Some day, perhaps . . .' `Some day! what is picture will stand still, but mademoiselle will not. She will rush at something, and behold l this face will be gone. No; I prefer to keep it as it is. It has truth now.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

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