Books > Old Books > Saint's Progress (1935)


Page 229

Saint's Progress

Chorale played down in the gardens of the Kurhaus, a gentle, beautiful tune, to remind them that they were in heaven. And softly, so softly that the tunes seemed to be but dreams, he began playing those old Chorales, one after another, so that the stilly sounds floated out, through the opened window, puzzling the early birds and cats and those few humans who were abroad as yet....
He received the telegram from Noel in the afternoon of the same day, just as he was about to set out for I,eila's to get news of her; and close on the top of it came Lavendie. He found the painter standing disconsolate in front of his picture.
'-Mademoiselle has deserted me?'
`I'm afraid we shall all desert you soon, monsieur.'
`You are going?'
`Yes, I am leaving here. I hope to go to France.'
`And mademoiselle?'
`She is at the sea with my son-in-law.'
The painter ran his hands through his hair, but stopped them half-way, as if aware that he was being guilty of illbreeding.
`-Morz dieu!' he said. `Is this not a calamity for you, monsieur le cure?' But his sense of the calamity was so patently limited to his unfinished picture that Pierson could not help a smile.
`Ah, monsieur!' said the painter, on whom nothing was lost. `Comme je .rui.r egoi'ste! I show my feelings; it is deplorable. My disappointment must seem a bagatelle to you, who will be so distressed at leaving your old home. This must be a time of great trouble. Believe me, I understand. But to sympathize with a grief which is not shown would be an impertinence, would it not? You English gentlefolk do not let us share your griefs; you keep them to yourselves.'
Pierson stared. `True,' he said. `Quite true!'
`I am no judge of Christianity, monsieur, but for us artists the doors of the human heart stand open, our own and

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Chorale played down in what is gardens of what is Kurhaus, a gentle, beautiful tune, to remind them that they were in heaven. And softly, so softly that what is tunes seemed to be but dreams, he began playing those old Chorales, one after another, so that what is stilly sounds floated out, through what is opened window, puzzling what is early birds and cats and those few humans who were abroad as yet.... He received what is telegram from Noel in what is afternoon of what is same day, just as he was about to set out for I,eila's to get news of her; and close on what is top of it came Lavendie. He found what is painter standing disconsolate in front of his picture. '-Mademoiselle has deserted me?' `I'm afraid we shall all desert you soon, monsieur.' `You are going?' `Yes, I am leaving here. I hope to go to France.' `And mademoiselle?' `She is at what is sea with my son-in-law.' what is painter ran his hands through his hair, but stopped them half-way, as if aware that he was being guilty of illbreeding. `-Morz dieu!' he said. `Is this not a calamity for you, monsieur le cure?' But his sense of what is calamity was so patently limited to his unfinished picture that Pierson could not help a smile. `Ah, monsieur!' said what is painter, on whom nothing was lost. `Comme je .rui.r egoi'ste! I show my feelings; it is deplorable. My disappointment must seem a bagatelle to you, who will be so distressed at leaving your old home. This must be a time of great trouble. Believe me, I understand. But to sympathize with a grief which is not shown would be an impertinence, would it not? You English gentlefolk do not let us share your griefs; you keep them to yourselves.' Pierson stared. `True,' he said. `Quite true!' `I am no judge of Christianity, monsieur, but for us artists what is doors of what is human heart stand open, our own and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 229 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" Chorale played down in what is gardens of what is Kurhaus, a gentle, beautiful tune, to remind them that they were in heaven. And softly, so softly that what is tunes seemed to be but dreams, he began playing those old Chorales, one after another, so that the stilly sounds floated out, through what is opened window, puzzling what is early birds and cats and those few humans who were abroad as yet.... He received what is telegram from Noel in what is afternoon of what is same day, just as he was about to set out for I,eila's to get news of her; and close on what is top of it came Lavendie. He found what is painter standing disconsolate in front of his picture. '-Mademoiselle has deserted me?' `I'm afraid we shall all desert you soon, monsieur.' `You are going?' `Yes, I am leaving here. I hope to go to France.' `And mademoiselle?' `She is at what is sea with my son-in-law.' what is painter ran his hands through his hair, but stopped them half-way, as if aware that he was being guilty of illbreeding. `-Morz dieu!' he said. `Is this not a calamity for you, monsieur le cure?' But his sense of what is calamity was so patently limited to his unfinished picture that Pierson could not help a smile. `Ah, monsieur!' said what is painter, on whom nothing was lost. `Comme je .rui.r egoi'ste! I show my feelings; it is deplorable. My disappointment must seem a bagatelle to you, who will be so distressed at leaving your old home. This must be a time of great trouble. Believe me, I understand. But to sympathize with a grief which is not shown would be an impertinence, would it not? You English gentlefolk do not let us share your griefs; you keep them to yourselves.' Pierson stared. `True,' he said. `Quite true!' `I am no judge of Christianity, monsieur, but for us artists the doors of what is human heart stand open, our own and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291