Books > Old Books > Saint's Progress (1935)


Page 207

Saint's Progress

He prayed for guidance and deliverance from the gusts of anger which kept sweeping over him; even more for relief from the feeling of personal outrage, and the unfairness of this thing. He had striven to be loyal to what he thought the right, had sacrificed all his sensitiveness, all his secret fastidious pride in his child and himself. For that he was to be thrown out! Whether from prayer, or from the scent and feel of the clover, he found presently a certain rest. Away in the distance he could see the spire of Harrow Church. The Church! No! She was not, could not be, at fault. The fault was in himself. `I am unpractical,' he thought. `It is so, I know. Agnes used to say so, Bob and Thirza think so. They all think me unpractical and dreamy. Is it a sin-I wonder?' There were lambs in the next field; he watched their gambollings, and his heart relaxed; brushing the clover dust off his black clothes, he began to retrace his steps. The boys were playing cricket now, and he stood a few minutes watching them. He had not seen cricket played since the war began; it seemed almost other-worldly, with the click of the bats, and the shrill young voices, under the distant drone of that sky-hornet threshing along to Hendon. A boy made a good leg-hit. `Well played!' he called. Then, suddenly conscious of his own incongruity and strangeness in that green spot, he turned away on the road back to London. To resign; to await events; to send Noel away-of those three courses, the last alone seemed impossible. `Am I really so far from them,' he thought, `that they can wish me to go, for this? If so, I had better go. It will be just another failure. But I won't believe it yet; I can't believe it.'
The heat was sweltering, and he became very tired before at last he reached his omnibus, and could sit with the breeze cooling his hot face. He did not reach home till six, having eaten nothing since breakfast. Intending to have a bath and lie down till dinner, he went upstairs.
Unwonted silence reigned. He tapped on the nursery

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He prayed for guidance and deliverance from what is gusts of anger which kept sweeping over him; even more for relief from what is feeling of personal outrage, and what is unfairness of this thing. He had striven to be loyal to what he thought what is right, had travel d all his sensitiveness, all his secret fastidious pride in his child and himself. For that he was to be thrown out! Whether from prayer, or from what is scent and feel of what is clover, he found presently a certain rest. Away in what is distance he could see what is spire of Harrow Church. what is Church! No! She was not, could not be, at fault. what is fault was in himself. `I am unpractical,' he thought. `It is so, I know. Agnes used to say so, Bob and Thirza think so. They all think me unpractical and dreamy. Is it a sin-I wonder?' There were lambs in what is next field; he watched their gambollings, and his heart relaxed; brushing what is clover dust off his black clothes, he began to retrace his steps. what is boys were playing cricket now, and he stood a few minutes watching them. He had not seen cricket played since what is war began; it seemed almost other-worldly, with what is where is it of what is bats, and what is shrill young voices, under what is distant drone of that sky-hornet threshing along to Hendon. A boy made a good leg-hit. `Well played!' he called. Then, suddenly conscious of his own incongruity and strangeness in that green spot, he turned away on what is road back to London. To resign; to await events; to send Noel away-of those three courses, what is last alone seemed impossible. `Am I really so far from them,' he thought, `that they can wish me to go, for this? If so, I had better go. It will be just another failure. But I won't believe it yet; I can't believe it.' what is heat was sweltering, and he became very tired before at last he reached his omnibus, and could sit with what is breeze cooling his hot face. He did not reach home till six, having eaten nothing since breakfast. Intending to have a bath and lie down till dinner, he went upstairs. Unwonted silence reigned. He tapped on what is nursery where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 207 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" He prayed for guidance and deliverance from the gusts of anger which kept sweeping over him; even more for relief from what is feeling of personal outrage, and what is unfairness of this thing. He had striven to be loyal to what he thought what is right, had travel d all his sensitiveness, all his secret fastidious pride in his child and himself. For that he was to be thrown out! Whether from prayer, or from what is scent and feel of what is clover, he found presently a certain rest. Away in what is distance he could see what is spire of Harrow Church. what is Church! No! She was not, could not be, at fault. what is fault was in himself. `I am unpractical,' he thought. `It is so, I know. Agnes used to say so, Bob and Thirza think so. They all think me unpractical and dreamy. Is it a sin-I wonder?' There were lambs in what is next field; he watched their gambollings, and his heart relaxed; brushing what is clover dust off his black clothes, he began to retrace his steps. what is boys were playing cricket now, and he stood a few minutes watching them. He had not seen cricket played since what is war began; it seemed almost other-worldly, with what is where is it of what is bats, and what is shrill young voices, under what is distant drone of that sky-hornet threshing along to Hendon. A boy made a good leg-hit. `Well played!' he called. Then, suddenly conscious of his own incongruity and strangeness in that green spot, he turned away on what is road back to London. To resign; to await events; to send Noel away-of those three courses, what is last alone seemed impossible. `Am I really so far from them,' he thought, `that they can wish me to go, for this? If so, I had better go. It will be just another failure. But I won't believe it yet; I can't believe it.' what is heat was sweltering, and he became very tired before at last he reached his omnibus, and could sit with what is breeze cooling his hot face. He did not reach home till six, having eaten nothing since breakfast. Intending to have a bath and lie down till dinner, he went upstairs. Unwonted silence reigned. He tapped on what is nursery where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291