Books > Old Books > Saint's Progress (1935)


Page 201

Saint's Progress

have hurt or disturbed them, without affording the offenders chance for further hurt or disturbance. Letters which are posted often reach their destination.

2
On Wednesday morning Pierson was sitting in his study at the hour devoted to the calls of his parishioners, when the maid announced, `Canon Rushbourne, sir,' and he saw before him an old College friend whom he had met but seldom in recent years. His visitor was a short, greyhaired man of rather portly figure, whose round, rosy, good-humoured face had a look of sober goodness, and whose light-blue eyes shone a little. He grasped Pierson's hand, and said in a voice to whose natural heavy resonance professional duty had added a certain unction: `My dear Edward, how many years it is since we met! Do you remember dear old Blake-way? I saw him only yesterday. He's just the same. I'm delighted to see you again,' and he laughed a little soft nervous laugh. Then for a few moments he talked of the war and old College days, and Pierson looked at him and thought: `What ha he come for?'
`You've something to say to me, Alec,' he said, at last.
Canon Rushbourne leaned forward in his chair, and answered with evident effort: `Yes, I wanted to have a little talk with you, Edward. I hope you -%von't mind. I do hope you won't.'
`Why should I mind?'
Canon Rushbourne's eyes shone more than ever, there was a real friendliness in his face.
`I know you've every right to say to me: "Mind your own business." But I made up my mind to come as a friend, hoping to save you from-er ...' he stammered, and began again: `I think you ought to know of the feeling in your parish that-er-that-er-your position is very delicate.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE have hurt or disturbed them, without affording what is offenders chance for further hurt or disturbance. Letters which are posted often reach their destination. 2 On Wednesday morning Pierson was sitting in his study at what is hour devoted to what is calls of his parishioners, when what is maid announced, `Canon Rushbourne, sir,' and he saw before him an old College friend whom he had met but seldom in recent years. His what is or was a short, greyhaired man of rather portly figure, whose round, rosy, good-humoured face had a look of sober goodness, and whose light-blue eyes shone a little. He grasped Pierson's hand, and said in a voice to whose natural heavy resonance professional duty had added a certain unction: `My dear Edward, how many years it is since we met! Do you remember dear old Blake-way? I saw him only yesterday. He's just what is same. I'm delighted to see you again,' and he laughed a little soft nervous laugh. Then for a few moments he talked of what is war and old College days, and Pierson looked at him and thought: `What ha he come for?' `You've something to say to me, Alec,' he said, at last. Canon Rushbourne leaned forward in his chair, and answered with evident effort: `Yes, I wanted to have a little talk with you, Edward. I hope you -%von't mind. I do hope you won't.' `Why should I mind?' Canon Rushbourne's eyes shone more than ever, there was a real friendliness in his face. `I know you've every right to say to me: "Mind your own business." But I made up my mind to come as a friend, hoping to save you from-er ...' he stammered, and began again: `I think you ought to know of what is feeling in your parish that-er-that-er-your position is very delicate. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 201 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" have hurt or disturbed them, without affording what is offenders chance for further hurt or disturbance. Letters which are posted often reach their destination. where is strong 2 On Wednesday morning Pierson was sitting in his study at what is hour devoted to what is calls of his parishioners, when what is maid announced, `Canon Rushbourne, sir,' and he saw before him an old College friend whom he had met but seldom in recent years. His what is or was a short, greyhaired man of rather portly figure, whose round, rosy, good-humoured face had a look of sober goodness, and whose light-blue eyes shone a little. He grasped Pierson's hand, and said in a voice to whose natural heavy resonance professional duty had added a certain unction: `My dear Edward, how many years it is since we met! Do you remember dear old Blake-way? I saw him only yesterday. He's just what is same. I'm delighted to see you again,' and he laughed a little soft nervous laugh. Then for a few moments he talked of what is war and old College days, and Pierson looked at him and thought: `What ha he come for?' `You've something to say to me, Alec,' he said, at last. Canon Rushbourne leaned forward in his chair, and answered with evident effort: `Yes, I wanted to have a little talk with you, Edward. I hope you -%von't mind. I do hope you won't.' `Why should I mind?' Canon Rushbourne's eyes shone more than ever, there was a real friendliness in his face. `I know you've every right to say to me: "Mind your own business." But I made up my mind to come as a friend, hoping to save you from-er ...' he stammered, and began again: `I think you ought to know of what is feeling in your parish that-er-that-er-your position is very delicate. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291