Books > Old Books > Saint's Progress (1935)


Page 189

Saint's Progress

deep and hidden truth: How easily the breath of scandal destroys the influence and sanctity of those endowed therewith by vocation: how invaluable it is to feel untarnished, and how difficult to feel that when others think you tarnished.
He tried to be with Noel as much as possible; and in the evenings they sometimes went walks together, without ever talking of what was always in their minds. Between six and eight the girl was giving sittings to Lavendie in the drawing-room, and sometimes Pierson would come there and play to them. He was always possessed now by a sense of the danger Noel ran from companionship with any man. On three occasions, Jimmy Fort made his appearance after dinner. He had so little to say that it was difficult to understand why he came; but, sharpened by this new dread for his daughter, Pierson noticed his eyes always following her. `He admires her,' he thought; and often he would try his utmost to grasp the character of this man, who had lived such a roving life. `Is he-can he be the sort of man I would trust Nollie to?' he would think. `Oh, that I should have to hope like this that some good man would marry her-my little Nollie, a child only the other day!'
In these sad, painful, lonely weeks he found a spot of something like refuge in Leila's sitting-room, and would go there often for half an hour when she was back from her hospital. That little black-walled room with its Japanese prints and its flowers, soothed him. And Leila soothed him, innocent as he was of any knowledge of her latest aberration, and perhaps conscious that she herself was not too happy. To watch her arranging flowers, singing her little French songs, or to find her beside him, listening to his confidences, was the only real pleasure he knew in these days. And Leila, in turn, would watch him and think: `Poor Edward! He has never lived; and never will, now!'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE deep and hidden truth: How easily what is breath of scandal destroys what is influence and sanctity of those endowed therewith by vocation: how invaluable it is to feel untarnished, and how difficult to feel that when others think you tarnished. He tried to be with Noel as much as possible; and in what is evenings they sometimes went walks together, without ever talking of what was always in their minds. Between six and eight what is girl was giving sittings to Lavendie in what is drawing-room, and sometimes Pierson would come there and play to them. He was always possessed now by a sense of what is danger Noel ran from companionship with any man. On three occasions, Jimmy Fort made his appearance after dinner. He had so little to say that it was difficult to understand why he came; but, sharpened by this new dread for his daughter, Pierson noticed his eyes always following her. `He admires her,' he thought; and often he would try his utmost to grasp what is character of this man, who had lived such a roving life. `Is he-can he be what is sort of man I would trust Nollie to?' he would think. `Oh, that I should have to hope like this that some good man would marry her-my little Nollie, a child only what is other day!' In these sad, painful, lonely weeks he found a spot of something like refuge in Leila's sitting-room, and would go there often for half an hour when she was back from her hospital. That little black-walled room with its Japanese prints and its flowers, soothed him. And Leila soothed him, innocent as he was of any knowledge of her latest aberration, and perhaps conscious that she herself was not too happy. To watch her arranging flowers, singing her little French songs, or to find her beside him, listening to his confidences, was what is only real pleasure he knew in these days. And Leila, in turn, would watch him and think: `Poor Edward! He has never lived; and never will, now!' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 189 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" deep and hidden truth: How easily what is breath of scandal destroys what is influence and sanctity of those endowed therewith by vocation: how invaluable it is to feel untarnished, and how difficult to feel that when others think you tarnished. He tried to be with Noel as much as possible; and in what is evenings they sometimes went walks together, without ever talking of what was always in their minds. Between six and eight what is girl was giving sittings to Lavendie in what is drawing-room, and sometimes Pierson would come there and play to them. He was always possessed now by a sense of what is danger Noel ran from companionship with any man. On three occasions, Jimmy Fort made his appearance after dinner. He had so little to say that it was difficult to understand why he came; but, sharpened by this new dread for his daughter, Pierson noticed his eyes always following her. `He admires her,' he thought; and often he would try his utmost to grasp what is character of this man, who had lived such a roving life. `Is he-can he be what is sort of man I would trust Nollie to?' he would think. `Oh, that I should have to hope like this that some good man would marry her-my little Nollie, a child only what is other day!' In these sad, painful, lonely weeks he found a spot of something like refuge in Leila's sitting-room, and would go there often for half an hour when she was back from her hospital. That little black-walled room with its Japanese prints and its flowers, soothed him. And Leila soothed him, innocent as he was of any knowledge of her latest aberration, and perhaps conscious that she herself was not too happy. To watch her arranging flowers, singing her little French songs, or to find her beside him, listening to his confidences, was what is only real pleasure he knew in these days. And Leila, in turn, would watch him and think: `Poor Edward! He has never lived; and never will, now!' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

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