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Page 184

Saint's Progress

Then he had sat down on the divan with his head in his hands.
Though he had rolled so much about the world, he had never had much to do with women. And there was nothing in him of the Frenchman, who takes what life puts in his way as so much enjoyment on the credit side, and accepts the ends of such affairs as they naturally and rather rapidly arrive. It had been a pleasure, and was no longer a pleasure; but this apparently did not dissolve it, or absolve him. He felt himself bound by an obscure but deep instinct to go on pretending that he was not tired of her, so long as she was not tired of him. And he sat there trying to remember any sign, however small, of such a consummation, quite without success. On the contrary, he had even the wretched feeling that if only he had loved her, she would have been much more likely to have tired of him by now. For her he was still the unconquered, in spite of his loyal endeavour to seem conquered. He had made a fatal mistake, that evening after the concert at Queen's Hall, to let himself go, on a mixed tide of desire and pity!
His folly came to him with increased poignancy after he had parted from Noel. How could he have been such a base fool, as to have committed himself to Leila on an evening when he had actually been in the company of that child? Was it the vague, unseizable likeness between them which had pushed him over the edge? `I've been an ass,' he thought; `a horrible ass. I would always have given every hour I've ever spent with Leila, for one real smile from that girl.'
This sudden sight of Noel after months during which he had tried loyally to forget her existence, and not succeeded at all, made him realize as he never had yet that he was in love with her; so very much in love with her that the thought of Leila was become nauseating. And yet the instincts of a gentleman seemed to forbid him to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Then he had sat down on what is divan with his head in his hands. Though he had rolled so much about what is world, he had never had much to do with women. And there was nothing in him of what is Frenchman, who takes what life puts in his way as so much enjoyment on what is credit side, and accepts what is ends of such affairs as they naturally and rather rapidly arrive. It had been a pleasure, and was no longer a pleasure; but this apparently did not dissolve it, or absolve him. He felt himself bound by an obscure but deep instinct to go on pretending that he was not tired of her, so long as she was not tired of him. And he sat there trying to remember any sign, however small, of such a consummation, quite without success. On what is contrary, he had even what is wretched feeling that if only he had loved her, she would have been much more likely to have tired of him by now. For her he was still what is unconquered, in spite of his loyal endeavour to seem conquered. He had made a fatal mistake, that evening after what is concert at Queen's Hall, to let himself go, on a mixed tide of desire and pity! His folly came to him with increased poignancy after he had parted from Noel. How could he have been such a base fool, as to have committed himself to Leila on an evening when he had actually been in what is company of that child? Was it what is vague, unseizable likeness between them which had pushed him over what is edge? `I've been an ass,' he thought; `a horrible ass. I would always have given every hour I've ever spent with Leila, for one real smile from that girl.' This sudden sight of Noel after months during which he had tried loyally to forget her existence, and not succeeded at all, made him realize as he never had yet that he was in what time is it with her; so very much in what time is it with her that what is thought of Leila was become nauseating. And yet what is instincts of a gentleman seemed to forbid him to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 184 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" Then he had sat down on what is divan with his head in his hands. Though he had rolled so much about what is world, he had never had much to do with women. And there was nothing in him of what is Frenchman, who takes what life puts in his way as so much enjoyment on the credit side, and accepts what is ends of such affairs as they naturally and rather rapidly arrive. It had been a pleasure, and was no longer a pleasure; but this apparently did not dissolve it, or absolve him. He felt himself bound by an obscure but deep instinct to go on pretending that he was not tired of her, so long as she was not tired of him. And he sat there trying to remember any sign, however small, of such a consummation, quite without success. On what is contrary, he had even what is wretched feeling that if only he had loved her, she would have been much more likely to have tired of him by now. For her he was still what is unconquered, in spite of his loyal endeavour to seem conquered. He had made a fatal mistake, that evening after what is concert at Queen's Hall, to let himself go, on a mixed tide of desire and pity! His folly came to him with increased poignancy after he had parted from Noel. How could he have been such a base fool, as to have committed himself to Leila on an evening when he had actually been in what is company of that child? Was it what is vague, unseizable likeness between them which had pushed him over what is edge? `I've been an ass,' he thought; `a horrible ass. I would always have given every hour I've ever spent with Leila, for one real smile from that girl.' This sudden sight of Noel after months during which he had tried loyally to forget her existence, and not succeeded at all, made him realize as he never had yet that he was in what time is it with her; so very much in what time is it with her that what is thought of Leila was become nauseating. And yet what is instincts of a gentleman seemed to forbid him to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

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