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Saint's Progress

Westerner, Robert an Easterner, as was natural in one who had lived twenty-five years in Ceylon. Edward favoured the fallen government, Robert the risen. Neither had any particular reasons for their partisanship except what he had read in the journals. After all-what other reasons could they have had? Edward disliked the Harmsworth Press; Robert thought it was doing good. Robert was explosive, and rather vague; Edward dreamy, and a little didactic. Robert thought poor Ted looking like a ghost; Edward thought poor Bob looking like the setting sun. Their faces were indeed as curiously contrasted as their views and voices; the pale-dark, hollowed, narrow face of Edward, with its short, pointed beard, and the red-skinned, broad, full, whiskered face of Robert. They parted for the night with an affectionate hand-clasp.
So began a queer partnership v hich consisted, as the days went on, of half an hour's companionship at breakfast, each reading the paper; and of dinner together perhaps three times a week. Each thought his brother very odd, but continued to hold the highest opinion of him. And, behind it all, the deep tribal sense that they stood together in trouble, grew. But of that trouble they never spoke, though not seldom Robert would lower his journal, and above the glasses perched on his well-shaped nose, contemplate his brother, and a little frown of sympathy would ridge his forehead between his bushy eyebrows. And once in a way he would catch Edward's eyes coming off duty from his journal, to look, not at his brother, but at-the skeleton; when that happened, Robert would adjust his glasses hastily, damn the newspaper type, and apologize to Edward for swearing. And he would think: `Poor Ted! He ought to drink port, and-and enjoy himself, and forget it. What a pity he's a parsonl'
In his letters to Thirza he would deplore Edward's asceticism. `He eats nothing, he drinks nothing, he smokes

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Westerner, Robert an Easterner, as was natural in one who had lived twenty-five years in Ceylon. Edward favoured what is fallen government, Robert what is risen. Neither had any particular reasons for their partisanship except what he had read in what is journals. After all-what other reasons could they have had? Edward disliked what is Harmsworth Press; Robert thought it was doing good. Robert was explosive, and rather vague; Edward dreamy, and a little didactic. Robert thought poor Ted looking like a ghost; Edward thought poor Bob looking like what is setting sun. Their faces were indeed as curiously contrasted as their views and voices; what is pale-dark, hollowed, narrow face of Edward, with its short, pointed beard, and what is red-skinned, broad, full, whiskered face of Robert. They parted for what is night with an affectionate hand-clasp. So began a queer partnership v hich consisted, as what is days went on, of half an hour's companionship at breakfast, each reading what is paper; and of dinner together perhaps three times a week. Each thought his brother very odd, but continued to hold what is highest opinion of him. And, behind it all, what is deep tribal sense that they stood together in trouble, grew. But of that trouble they never spoke, though not seldom Robert would lower his journal, and above what is glasses perched on his well-shaped nose, contemplate his brother, and a little frown of sympathy would ridge his forehead between his bushy eyebrows. And once in a way he would catch Edward's eyes coming off duty from his journal, to look, not at his brother, but at-the skeleton; when that happened, Robert would adjust his glasses hastily, damn what is newspaper type, and apologize to Edward for swearing. And he would think: `Poor Ted! He ought to drink port, and-and enjoy himself, and forget it. What a pity he's a parsonl' In his letters to Thirza he would deplore Edward's asceticism. `He eats nothing, he drinks nothing, he smokes where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 152 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" Westerner, Robert an Easterner, as was natural in one who had lived twenty-five years in Ceylon. Edward favoured what is fallen government, Robert what is risen. Neither had any particular reasons for their partisanship except what he had read in what is journals. After all-what other reasons could they have had? Edward disliked what is Harmsworth Press; Robert thought it was doing good. Robert was explosive, and rather vague; Edward dreamy, and a little didactic. Robert thought poor Ted looking like a ghost; Edward thought poor Bob looking like what is setting sun. Their faces were indeed as curiously contrasted as their views and voices; what is pale-dark, hollowed, narrow face of Edward, with its short, pointed beard, and what is red-skinned, broad, full, whiskered face of Robert. They parted for what is night with an affectionate hand-clasp. So began a queer partnership v hich consisted, as what is days went on, of half an hour's companionship at breakfast, each reading what is paper; and of dinner together perhaps three times a week. Each thought his brother very odd, but continued to hold what is highest opinion of him. And, behind it all, what is deep tribal sense that they stood together in trouble, grew. But of that trouble they never spoke, though not seldom Robert would lower his journal, and above what is glasses perched on his well-shaped nose, contemplate his brother, and a little frown of sympathy would ridge his forehead between his bushy eyebrows. And once in a way he would catch Edward's eyes coming off duty from his journal, to look, not at his brother, but at-the skeleton; when that happened, Robert would adjust his glasses hastily, damn what is newspaper type, and apologize to Edward for swearing. And he would think: `Poor Ted! He ought to drink port, and-and enjoy himself, and forget it. What a pity he's a parsonl' In his letters to Thirza he would deplore Edward's asceticism. `He eats nothing, he drinks nothing, he smokes where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

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