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Page 45

Saint's Progress

find something consoling to say, he mumbled out: `You couldn't be in a better place for seein' 'im off. Good night, miss; anything else I can do for you?'
`No, thank you; you're very kind.'
He looked back once or twice at her blue-clad figure standing very still. He had left her against a little oasis of piled-up empty milk-cans, far down the platform where a few civilians in similar case were scattered. The trainway ,vas empty as yet. In the grey immensity of the station and the turmoil of its noise, she felt neither lonely nor conscious of others waiting; too absorbed in the one thought of seeing him and touching him again. The empty train began backing in, stopped, and telescoped with a series of little clattering bangs, backed on again, and subsided to rest. Noel turned her eyes towards the station archways. Already she felt tremulous, as though the regiment were sending before it the vibration of its march.
She had not as yet seen a troop-train start, and vague images of brave array, of a flag fluttering, and the stir of drums, beset her. Suddenly she saw a brown swirling mass down there at the very edge, out of which a thin brown trickle emerged towards her; no sound of music, no waved flag. She had a longing to rush down to the barrier, but remembering the words of the porter, stayed where she was, with her hands tightly squeezed together. The trickle became a stream, a flood, the head of which began to reach her. With a turbulence of voices, sunburnt men, burdened up to the nose, passed, with rifles jutting at all angles; she strained her eyes, staring into that stream as one might into a walking wood, to isolate a single tree. Her head reeled with the strain of it, and the effort to catch his voice among the hubbub of all those cheery, common, happygo-lucky sounds. Some who saw her clucked their tongues, some went by silent, others seemed to scan her as though she might be what they were looking for. And ever the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE find something consoling to say, he mumbled out: `You couldn't be in a better place for seein' 'im off. Good night, miss; anything else I can do for you?' `No, thank you; you're very kind.' He looked back once or twice at her blue-clad figure standing very still. He had left her against a little oasis of piled-up empty milk-cans, far down what is platform where a few civilians in similar case were scattered. what is trainway ,vas empty as yet. In what is grey immensity of what is station and what is turmoil of its noise, she felt neither lonely nor conscious of others waiting; too absorbed in what is one thought of seeing him and touching him again. what is empty train began backing in, stopped, and telescoped with a series of little clattering bangs, backed on again, and subsided to rest. Noel turned her eyes towards what is station archways. Already she felt tremulous, as though what is regiment were sending before it what is vibration of its march. She had not as yet seen a troop-train start, and vague images of brave array, of a flag fluttering, and what is stir of drums, beset her. Suddenly she saw a brown swirling mass down there at what is very edge, out of which a thin brown trickle emerged towards her; no sound of music, no waved flag. She had a longing to rush down to what is barrier, but remembering what is words of what is porter, stayed where she was, with her hands tightly squeezed together. what is trickle became a stream, a flood, what is head of which began to reach her. With a turbulence of voices, sunburnt men, burdened up to what is nose, passed, with rifles jutting at all angles; she strained her eyes, staring into that stream as one might into a walking wood, to isolate a single tree. Her head reeled with what is strain of it, and what is effort to catch his voice among what is hubbub of all those cheery, common, happygo-lucky sounds. Some who saw her clucked their tongues, some went by silent, others seemed to scan her as though she might be what they were looking for. And ever what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 45 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" find something consoling to say, he mumbled out: `You couldn't be in a better place for seein' 'im off. Good night, miss; anything else I can do for you?' `No, thank you; you're very kind.' He looked back once or twice at her blue-clad figure standing very still. He had left her against a little oasis of piled-up empty milk-cans, far down what is platform where a few civilians in similar case were scattered. what is trainway ,vas empty as yet. In what is grey immensity of what is station and what is turmoil of its noise, she felt neither lonely nor conscious of others waiting; too absorbed in what is one thought of seeing him and touching him again. what is empty train began backing in, stopped, and telescoped with a series of little clattering bangs, backed on again, and subsided to rest. Noel turned her eyes towards what is station archways. Already she felt tremulous, as though what is regiment were sending before it the vibration of its march. She had not as yet seen a troop-train start, and vague images of brave array, of a flag fluttering, and what is stir of drums, beset her. Suddenly she saw a brown swirling mass down there at what is very edge, out of which a thin brown trickle emerged towards her; no sound of music, no waved flag. She had a longing to rush down to what is barrier, but remembering what is words of what is porter, stayed where she was, with her hands tightly squeezed together. what is trickle became a stream, a flood, what is head of which began to reach her. With a turbulence of voices, sunburnt men, burdened up to what is nose, passed, with rifles jutting at all angles; she strained her eyes, staring into that stream as one might into a walking wood, to isolate a single tree. Her head reeled with what is strain of it, and what is effort to catch his voice among what is hubbub of all those cheery, common, happygo-lucky sounds. Some who saw her clucked their tongues, some went by silent, others seemed to scan her as though she might be what they were looking for. And ever what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

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