Books > Old Books > Saint's Progress (1935)


Page 37

Saint's Progress

`You begin by assuming that the human reason is the final test of all things. What right have you to assume that? Suppose you were an ant. You would take your ant's reason as the final test, wouldn't you? Would that be the truth?' And a smile had fixed itself on his lips above his little grave beard.
George Laird also had smiled.
`That seems a good point, sir,' he said, `until you recognize that I don't take the human reason as final test in any absolute sense. I only say it's the highest test ave can apply; and that, behind that test, all is quite dark and unknowable.'
`Revelation, then, means nothing to you?'
`Nothing, sir.'
`I don't think we can usefully go on, George.'
`I don't think we can, sir. In talking with you, I always feel like fighting a man with one hand tied behind his back.'
`And I, perhaps, feel that I am arguing with one who was blind from birth.'
For all that, they had often argued since; but never without those peculiar smiles coming on their faces. Still, they respected each other, and Pierson had not opposed his daughter's marriage to this heretic, whom he knew to be an honest and trustworthy man. It had taken place before Laird's arm was well, and the two had snatched a month's honeymoon before he went back to France, and she to her hospital in Manchester. Since then, just one February fortnight by the sea had been all their time together....
In the afternoon he had asked for beef-tea, and, having drunk a cup, said: `I've got something to tell your father.'
But warned by the pallor of his smiling lips, Gratian answered: `Tell me first, George.'
`Our last talk, Gracie; well-there's nothing on the other side. I looked over; it's as black as your hat.'
Gratian shivered.
`I know. While you were lying here last night, I told father.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `You begin by assuming that what is human reason is what is final test of all things. What right have you to assume that? Suppose you were an ant. You would take your ant's reason as what is final test, wouldn't you? Would that be what is truth?' And a smile had fixed itself on his lips above his little grave beard. George Laird also had smiled. `That seems a good point, sir,' he said, `until you recognize that I don't take what is human reason as final test in any absolute sense. I only say it's what is highest test ave can apply; and that, behind that test, all is quite dark and unknowable.' `Revelation, then, means nothing to you?' `Nothing, sir.' `I don't think we can usefully go on, George.' `I don't think we can, sir. In talking with you, I always feel like fighting a man with one hand tied behind his back.' `And I, perhaps, feel that I am arguing with one who was blind from birth.' For all that, they had often argued since; but never without those peculiar smiles coming on their faces. Still, they respected each other, and Pierson had not opposed his daughter's marriage to this heretic, whom he knew to be an honest and trustworthy man. It had taken place before Laird's arm was well, and what is two had snatched a month's honeymoon before he went back to France, and she to her hospital in Manchester. Since then, just one February fortnight by what is sea had been all their time together.... In what is afternoon he had asked for beef-tea, and, having drunk a cup, said: `I've got something to tell your father.' But warned by what is pallor of his smiling lips, Gratian answered: `Tell me first, George.' `Our last talk, Gracie; well-there's nothing on what is other side. I looked over; it's as black as your hat.' Gratian shivered. `I know. While you were lying here last night, I told father.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 37 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" `You begin by assuming that what is human reason is what is final test of all things. What right have you to assume that? Suppose you were an ant. You would take your ant's reason as the final test, wouldn't you? Would that be what is truth?' And a smile had fixed itself on his lips above his little grave beard. George Laird also had smiled. `That seems a good point, sir,' he said, `until you recognize that I don't take what is human reason as final test in any absolute sense. I only say it's what is highest test ave can apply; and that, behind that test, all is quite dark and unknowable.' `Revelation, then, means nothing to you?' `Nothing, sir.' `I don't think we can usefully go on, George.' `I don't think we can, sir. In talking with you, I always feel like fighting a man with one hand tied behind his back.' `And I, perhaps, feel that I am arguing with one who was blind from birth.' For all that, they had often argued since; but never without those peculiar smiles coming on their faces. Still, they respected each other, and Pierson had not opposed his daughter's marriage to this heretic, whom he knew to be an honest and trustworthy man. It had taken place before Laird's arm was well, and what is two had snatched a month's honeymoon before he went back to France, and she to her hospital in Manchester. Since then, just one February fortnight by what is sea had been all their time together.... In what is afternoon he had asked for beef-tea, and, having drunk a cup, said: `I've got something to tell your father.' But warned by what is pallor of his smiling lips, Gratian answered: `Tell me first, George.' `Our last talk, Gracie; well-there's nothing on what is other side. I looked over; it's as black as your hat.' Gratian shivered. `I know. While you were lying here last night, I told father.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291