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Saint's Progress

reaching a point when he wanted to say: `If we're not to trust our reason and our senses for what they're worth, sir-will you kindly tell me what we are to trust? How can we exert them to the utmost in some matters, and in others suddenly turn our backs on them?' Once, in one of their discussions, which often bordered on acrimony, he had expounded himself at length.
`I grant,' he had said, `that there's a great ultimate Mystery, that we shall never know anything for certain about the origin of life and the principle of the Universe; but why should we suddenly shut up our inquiring apparatus and deny all the evidence of our reason-say, about the story of Christ, or the question of a future life, or our moral code? If you want me to enter a temple of little mysteries, leaving my reason and senses behind-as a Mohammedan leaves his shoes-it won't do to say to me simply: "There it is! Enter I" You must show me the door; and you can'tl And I'll tell you why, sir. Because in your brain there's a little twist which is not in mine, or the lack of a little twist which is in mine. Nothing more than that divides us into the two main species of mankind, one of whom worships, and one of whom doesn't. Oh, yes! I know you won't admit that, because it makes your religions natural instead of what you call supernatural. But I assure you there's nothing more to it Your eyes look up or they look down-they never look straight before them. Well, mine do just the opposite.'
That day Pierson had been feeling very tired, and though to meet this attack was vital, he had been unable to meet it. His brain had stammered. He had turned a little away, leaning his cheek on his hand, as if to cover that momentary break in his defences. Some days later he had said: `I am able now to answer your questions, George. I think I can make you understand.'
Laird had answered: `All right, sir; go ahead.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE reaching a point when he wanted to say: `If we're not to trust our reason and our senses for what they're worth, sir-will you kindly tell me what we are to trust? How can we exert them to what is utmost in some matters, and in others suddenly turn our backs on them?' Once, in one of their discussions, which often bordered on acrimony, he had expounded himself at length. `I grant,' he had said, `that there's a great ultimate Mystery, that we shall never know anything for certain about what is origin of life and what is principle of what is Universe; but why should we suddenly shut up our inquiring apparatus and deny all what is evidence of our reason-say, about what is story of Christ, or what is question of a future life, or our moral code? If you want me to enter a temple of little mysteries, leaving my reason and senses behind-as a Mohammedan leaves his shoes-it won't do to say to me simply: "There it is! Enter I" You must show me what is door; and you can'tl And I'll tell you why, sir. Because in your brain there's a little twist which is not in mine, or what is lack of a little twist which is in mine. Nothing more than that divides us into what is two main species of mankind, one of whom worships, and one of whom doesn't. Oh, yes! I know you won't admit that, because it makes your religions natural instead of what you call supernatural. But I assure you there's nothing more to it Your eyes look up or they look down-they never look straight before them. Well, mine do just what is opposite.' That day Pierson had been feeling very tired, and though to meet this attack was vital, he had been unable to meet it. His brain had stammered. He had turned a little away, leaning his cheek on his hand, as if to cover that momentary break in his defences. Some days later he had said: `I am able now to answer your questions, George. I think I can make you understand.' Laird had answered: `All right, sir; go ahead.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Saint's Progress (1935) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 36 where is p align="center" where is strong Saint's Progress where is p align="justify" reaching a point when he wanted to say: `If we're not to trust our reason and our senses for what they're worth, sir-will you kindly tell me what we are to trust? How can we exert them to what is utmost in some matters, and in others suddenly turn our backs on them?' Once, in one of their discussions, which often bordered on acrimony, he had expounded himself at length. `I grant,' he had said, `that there's a great ultimate Mystery, that we shall never know anything for certain about what is origin of life and what is principle of what is Universe; but why should we suddenly shut up our inquiring apparatus and deny all what is evidence of our reason-say, about what is story of Christ, or what is question of a future life, or our moral code? If you want me to enter a temple of little mysteries, leaving my reason and senses behind-as a Mohammedan leaves his shoes-it won't do to say to me simply: "There it is! Enter I" You must show me what is door; and you can'tl And I'll tell you why, sir. Because in your brain there's a little twist which is not in mine, or what is lack of a little twist which is in mine. Nothing more than that divides us into what is two main species of mankind, one of whom worships, and one of whom doesn't. Oh, yes! I know you won't admit that, because it makes your religions natural instead of what you call supernatural. But I assure you there's nothing more to it Your eyes look up or they look down-they never look straight before them. Well, mine do just what is opposite.' That day Pierson had been feeling very tired, and though to meet this attack was vital, he had been unable to meet it. His brain had stammered. He had turned a little away, leaning his cheek on his hand, as if to cover that momentary break in his defences. Some days later he had said: `I am able now to answer your questions, George. I think I can make you understand.' Laird had answered: `All right, sir; go ahead.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Saint's Progress (1935) books

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