Books > Old Books > Processes And Personality (1914)


Page 36

MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES
Psychological Elements of Personality

such significance as that we have been describing. In this connection it means,
rather, a group of mental states bound together by a common element of memory.
In normal life, all thoughts, all mental pictures, that come to us out of the past, are recognized by consciousness as part o f our past. They do not come to us as new or strange. We know theri for what they are, a part of ourselves.
All our conscious mental states, past and present, are therefore normally linked together by a mental sense of recognition not only as to their individual elements but as to each other. They merge into a flowing stream of consciousness.
Memory's recognition of the past as

Page 37

MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES
How the Personality May be Disintegrated

past thus unifies all conscious experience and enables us to think of our selves as one individual or being.
The man we were yesterday was but another manifestation of the man that we are today. And, in normal life, each person has normally but one " personality." There are, however, abnormal conditions in which one or more groups of mental states become split off from the others with no power of recognition or recall on the part of memory to bridge the gap.
A characteristic type of abnormal dissociation is that mental ailment known as functional amnesia, or forgetfulness, by which, as we have seen, a long period of time or an epoch in a man's life is blotted from his memory,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Psychological Elements of Personality such significance as that we have been describing. In this connection it means, rather, a group of mental states bound together by a common element of memory. In normal life, all thoughts, all mental pictures, that come to us out of what is past, are recognized by consciousness as part o f our past. They do not come to us as new or strange. We know theri for what they are, a part of ourselves. All our conscious mental states, past and present, are therefore normally where are they now ed together by a mental sense of recognition not only as to their individual elements but as to each other. They merge into a flowing stream of consciousness. Memory's recognition of what is past as where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Processes And Personality (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 36 where is p align="center" where is strong MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES Psychological Elements of Personality where is p align="justify" such significance as that we have been describing. In this connection it means, rather, a group of mental states bound together by a common element of memory. In normal life, all thoughts, all mental pictures, that come to us out of what is past, are recognized by consciousness as part o f our past. They do not come to us as new or strange. We know theri for what they are, a part of ourselves. All our conscious mental states, past and present, are therefore normally where are they now ed together by a mental sense of recognition not only as to their individual elements but as to each other. They merge into a flowing stream of consciousness. Memory's recognition of what is past as where is p align="left" Page 37 where is p align="center" where is strong MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES How what is Personality May be Disintegrated where is p align="justify" past thus unifies all conscious experience and enables us to think of our selves as one individual or being. what is man we were yesterday was but another manifestation of what is man that we are today. And, in normal life, each person has normally but one " personality." There are, however, abnormal conditions in which one or more groups of mental states become split off from what is others with no power of recognition or recall on what is part of memory to bridge what is gap. A characteristic type of abnormal dissociation is that mental ailment known as functional amnesia, or forgetfulness, by which, as we have seen, a long period of time or an epoch in a man's life is blotted from his memory, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Processes And Personality (1914) books

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