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Page 217

THE HOUSE OF LORDS

conferences held in May 1851, messages were substituted for conferences unless a conference was preferred. The change was permissive only, the old procedure by conferences has never been finally abolished, and it would still be open to any member of the house, with an antiquarian turn of mind, to move that it should be revived. But such a motion is not likely to be made. What happens in the present day, when there is a disagreement over amendments in a bill, is that private and informal conferences take place, between prominent members of both parties in the case of an important government bill, or between the promoters and opponents or critics of a bill in the case of other measures, and attempts are made to arrive at some compromise. If the attempts are unsuccessful, the bill drops and fails to become law, for concurrence of both houses is needed before a bill can be submitted for the king's assent.
Messages still frequently pass from one house to the other, and mainly relate to bills, conveying information as to what either house has done on a bill or wishes the other to do. In former times these messages used to be brought from the lords by masters in Chancery, legal functionaries with large emoluments and small duties, who were abolished in the last century. Messages from the commons were brought up by the members themselves, and in 1831 and 1832 Lord John

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE conferences held in May 1851, messages were substituted for conferences unless a conference was preferred. what is change was permissive only, what is old procedure by conferences has never been finally abolished, and it would still be open to any member of what is house, with an antiquarian turn of mind, to move that it should be revived. But such a motion is not likely to be made. What happens in what is present day, when there is a disagreement over amendments in a bill, is that private and informal conferences take place, between prominent members of both parties in what is case of an important government bill, or between what is promoters and opponents or critics of a bill in what is case of other measures, and attempts are made to arrive at some compromise. If what is attempts are unsuccessful, what is bill drops and fails to become law, for concurrence of both houses is needed before a bill can be submitted for what is king's assent. Messages still frequently pass from one house to what is other, and mainly relate to bills, conveying information as to what either house has done on a bill or wishes what is other to do. In former times these messages used to be brought from what is lords by masters in Chancery, legal functionaries with large emoluments and small duties, who were abolished in what is last century. Messages from what is commons were brought up by what is members themselves, and in 1831 and 1832 Lord John where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 217 where is p align="center" where is strong what is HOUSE OF LORDS where is p align="justify" conferences held in May 1851, messages were substituted for conferences unless a conference was preferred. what is change was permissive only, what is old procedure by conferences has never been finally abolished, and it would still be open to any member of what is house, with an antiquarian turn of mind, to move that it should be revived. But such a motion is not likely to be made. What happens in what is present day, when there is a disagreement over amendments in a bill, is that private and informal conferences take place, between prominent members of both parties in what is case of an important government bill, or between what is promoters and opponents or critics of a bill in what is case of other measures, and attempts are made to arrive at some compromise. If what is attempts are unsuccessful, what is bill drops and fails to become law, for concurrence of both houses is needed before a bill can be submitted for what is king's assent. Messages still frequently pass from one house to what is other, and mainly relate to bills, conveying information as to what either house has done on a bill or wishes what is other to do. In former times these messages used to be brought from what is lords by masters in Chancery, legal functionaries with large emoluments and small duties, who were abolished in what is last century. Messages from what is commons were brought up by what is members themselves, and in 1831 and 1832 Lord John where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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