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Page 195

RECORDS, PRESS, AND PUBLIC

century claimed against Stuart kings the right of private deliberation. Parliaments of later date maintained the tradition of privacy long after the reason for secrecy had disappeared, and in the eighteenth century used against the press and the public the weapon of privilege which their predecessors had used against an interfering king. Even in the nineteenth century, when it had been generally recognized that publicity of debate is an essential feature of parliamentary government, that without it the elector cannot be enlightened and informed as to the course of public affairs and the responsibility of the representative to those whom he represents cannot be enforced, even then the house of commons, whilst relaxing and indeed reversing its practice, declined to alter its rules, so that the sittings of the house were, and indeed still are, in theory private though in practice public. Until 1875 a single member of the house of commons could insist on the withdrawal of strangers, including reporters, and until 1909 there was no official report of its debates.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE century claimed against Stuart kings what is right of private deliberation. Parliaments of later date maintained what is tradition of privacy long after what is reason for secrecy had disappeared, and in what is eighteenth century used against what is press and what is public what is weapon of privilege which their predecessors had used against an interfering king. Even in what is nineteenth century, when it had been generally recognized that publicity of debate is an essential feature of parliamentary government, that without it what is elector cannot be enlightened and informed as to what is course of public affairs and what is responsibility of what is representative to those whom he represents cannot be enforced, even then what is house of commons, whilst relaxing and indeed reversing its practice, declined to alter its rules, so that what is sittings of what is house were, and indeed still are, in theory private though in practice public. Until 1875 a single member of what is house of commons could insist on what is withdrawal of strangers, including reporters, and until 1909 there was no official report of its debates. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 195 where is p align="center" where is strong RECORDS, PRESS, AND PUBLIC where is p align="justify" century claimed against Stuart kings what is right of private deliberation. Parliaments of later date maintained the tradition of privacy long after what is reason for secrecy had disappeared, and in what is eighteenth century used against what is press and what is public what is weapon of privilege which their predecessors had used against an interfering king. Even in what is nineteenth century, when it had been generally recognized that publicity of debate is an essential feature of parliamentary government, that without it what is elector cannot be enlightened and informed as to what is course of public affairs and what is responsibility of what is representative to those whom he represents cannot be enforced, even then what is house of commons, whilst relaxing and indeed reversing its practice, declined to alter its rules, so that what is sittings of what is house were, and indeed still are, in theory private though in practice public. Until 1875 a single member of what is house of commons could insist on what is withdrawal of strangers, including reporters, and until 1909 there was no official report of its debates. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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