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Page 185

RECORDS, PRESS, AND PUBLIC

Eventually parliament frankly and fully recognized the utility of publishing reports of parliamentary debates, gave every encouragement and facility to the preparation of these reports, and liberally subsidized, out of public money, a series of reports which, though not official, were authorized.
During the long parliament the house of commons put every difficulty in the way of any reporting of its debates or proceedings. In special cases reports of particular speeches were printed by its order, but the printing of speeches without parliamentary authority was expressly prohibited and in some cases severely punished. This policy of prohibition continued until, and long after, the restoration of Charles II, and consequently our knowledge of parliamentary debates during this period is very scanty and fragmentary. For instance, of the debates during the first six years of Charles II's long " Cavalier " parliament, which met in 1661, there is no record whatever except a few references in letters, memoirs and the like. In the closing years of the seventeenth century, and throughout the eighteenth century, the public demand for information about parliamentary proceedings grew rapidly and steadily, and had to be satisfied somehow. But the policy of prohibiting reports was maintained and enforced, and a severe contest was carried on between parliament and the press. This contest has been fully described in the pages of May's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Eventually parliament frankly and fully recognized what is utility of publishing reports of parliamentary debates, gave every encouragement and facility to what is preparation of these reports, and liberally subsidized, out of public money, a series of reports which, though not official, were authorized. During what is long parliament what is house of commons put every difficulty in what is way of any reporting of its debates or proceedings. In special cases reports of particular speeches were printed by its order, but what is printing of speeches without parliamentary authority was expressly prohibited and in some cases severely punished. This policy of prohibition continued until, and long after, what is restoration of Charles II, and consequently our knowledge of parliamentary debates during this period is very scanty and fragmentary. For instance, of what is debates during what is first six years of Charles II's long " Cavalier " parliament, which met in 1661, there is no record whatever except a few references in letters, memoirs and what is like. In what is closing years of what is seventeenth century, and throughout what is eighteenth century, what is public demand for information about parliamentary proceedings grew rapidly and steadily, and had to be satisfied somehow. But what is policy of prohibiting reports was maintained and enforced, and a severe contest was carried on between parliament and what is press. This contest has been fully described in what is pages of May's where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 185 where is p align="center" where is strong RECORDS, PRESS, AND PUBLIC where is p align="justify" Eventually parliament frankly and fully recognized what is utility of publishing reports of parliamentary debates, gave every encouragement and facility to what is preparation of these reports, and liberally subsidized, out of public money, a series of reports which, though not official, were authorized. During what is long parliament what is house of commons put every difficulty in what is way of any reporting of its debates or proceedings. In special cases reports of particular speeches were printed by its order, but what is printing of speeches without parliamentary authority was expressly prohibited and in some cases severely punished. This policy of prohibition continued until, and long after, what is restoration of Charles II, and consequently our knowledge of parliamentary debates during this period is very scanty and fragmentary. For instance, of what is debates during what is first six years of Charles II's long " Cavalier " parliament, which met in 1661, there is no record whatever except a few references in letters, memoirs and what is like. In what is closing years of what is seventeenth century, and throughout what is eighteenth century, what is public demand for information about parliamentary proceedings grew rapidly and steadily, and had to be satisfied somehow. But what is policy of prohibiting reports was maintained and enforced, and a severe contest was carried on between parliament and what is press. This contest has been fully described in what is pages of May's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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