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MEMBER AND CONSTITUENTS

enormous both in the character of the constituencies and in the position of the members returned, these principles would probably be accepted by most members of parliament as sound at the present day. A member of parliament is elected by a local constituency, he has special duties towards it; but he is not a mere delegate or mouthpiece; he is a member of a body which is responsible for the interests of the country at large, and, though he is influenced by the wishes and views of his constituents and by the action of his party, he does not surrender his right of independent judgment.
In the earliest days of parliamentary history the ties which bound a member to his constituents were much closer than they are at present. There were several reasons for this. The work of the house of commons was less important; the functions of the commons were mainly to present petitions for the redress of grievances and to grant taxes; they had not yet become responsible for the administration of the country. Parliaments were short. Members were required to be resident in their constituencies. They received wages from their constituents. Thus they were much in the position of paid agents of, or delegates from, particular bodies or communities, and it is not surprising that in 1339, when the commons were asked to grant an aid asked for by the king, they replied that they could not do so without consulting

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE enormous both in what is character of what is constituencies and in what is position of what is members returned, these principles would probably be accepted by most members of parliament as sound at what is present day. A member of parliament is elected by a local constituency, he has special duties towards it; but he is not a mere delegate or mouthpiece; he is a member of a body which is responsible for what is interests of what is country at large, and, though he is influenced by what is wishes and views of his constituents and by what is action of his party, he does not surrender his right of independent judgment. In what is earliest days of parliamentary history what is ties which bound a member to his constituents were much closer than they are at present. There were several reasons for this. what is work of what is house of commons was less important; what is functions of what is commons were mainly to present petitions for what is redress of grievances and to grant taxes; they had not yet become responsible for what is administration of what is country. Parliaments were short. Members were required to be resident in their constituencies. They received wages from their constituents. Thus they were much in what is position of paid agents of, or delegates from, particular bodies or communities, and it is not surprising that in 1339, when what is commons were asked to grant an aid asked for by what is king, they replied that they could not do so without consulting where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 160 where is p align="center" where is strong MEMBER AND CONSTITUENTS where is p align="justify" enormous both in what is character of what is constituencies and in what is position of what is members returned, these principles would probably be accepted by most members of parliament as sound at what is present day. A member of parliament is elected by a local constituency, he has special duties towards it; but he is not a mere delegate or mouthpiece; he is a member of a body which is responsible for what is interests of what is country at large, and, though he is influenced by what is wishes and views of his constituents and by what is action of his party, he does not surrender his right of independent judgment. In what is earliest days of parliamentary history what is ties which bound a member to his constituents were much closer than they are at present. There were several reasons for this. what is work of what is house of commons was less important; what is functions of what is commons were mainly to present petitions for what is redress of grievances and to grant taxes; they had not yet become responsible for what is administration of what is country. Parliaments were short. Members were required to be resident in their constituencies. They received wages from their constituents. Thus they were much in what is position of paid agents of, or delegates from, particular bodies or communities, and it is not surprising that in 1339, when what is commons were asked to grant an aid asked for by what is king, they replied that they could not do so without consulting where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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