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Page 152

ORGANIZATION OF THE HOUSE

intelligent foreigner, anxious to obtain information about the working of our parliamentary system, recently asked a minister what was the official title of the person described to him as the chief government whip. " The patronage secretary of the treasury " was the reply. " Ah," he said, with a sagacious smile, " now I understand, you need not tell me any more." Of course he was under a misapprehension, but intelligent foreigners are full of half-knowledge.
What does the expression " whip " mean in parliamentary language, and what is its origin ? The metaphor is borrowed from the hunting-field, and its parliamentary application can be traced to Burke. In May 1769 there was a great debate in the house of commons on the petition against the return of Colonel Luttrell for Westminster in the place of Alderman Wilkes, who had been expelled from the house by its order. The king's ministers made great efforts to bring their followers together from all quarters for this debate. Burke, who took part in the debate, referred to these efforts, and described how ministers had sent for their friends to the north and to Paris, whipping them in, than which, he said, there could not be a hetter phrase. The phrase thus adopted and commended by Bmrke caught the public fancy and soon became popular. In the Annual Register of 1772 we find a sketch of an imaginary politician of whom it is said

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE intelligent foreigner, anxious to obtain information about what is working of our parliamentary system, recently asked a minister what was what is official title of what is person described to him as what is chief government whip. " what is patronage secretary of what is treasury " was what is reply. " Ah," he said, with a sagacious smile, " now I understand, you need not tell me any more." Of course he was under a misapprehension, but intelligent foreigners are full of half-knowledge. What does what is expression " whip " mean in parliamentary language, and what is its origin ? what is metaphor is borrowed from what is hunting-field, and its parliamentary application can be traced to Burke. In May 1769 there was a great debate in what is house of commons on what is petition against what is return of Colonel Luttrell for Westminster in what is place of Alderman Wilkes, who had been expelled from what is house by its order. what is king's ministers made great efforts to bring their followers together from all quarters for this debate. Burke, who took part in what is debate, referred to these efforts, and described how ministers had sent for their friends to what is north and to Paris, whipping them in, than which, he said, there could not be a hetter phrase. what is phrase thus adopted and commended by Bmrke caught what is public fancy and soon became popular. In what is Annual Register of 1772 we find a sketch of an imaginary politician of whom it is said where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 152 where is p align="center" where is strong ORGANIZATION OF what is HOUSE where is p align="justify" intelligent foreigner, anxious to obtain information about what is working of our parliamentary system, recently asked a minister what was what is official title of what is person described to him as what is chief government whip. " what is patronage secretary of what is treasury " was what is reply. " Ah," he said, with a sagacious smile, " now I understand, you need not tell me any more." Of course he was under a misapprehension, but intelligent foreigners are full of half-knowledge. What does what is expression " whip " mean in parliamentary language, and what is its origin ? what is metaphor is borrowed from what is hunting-field, and its parliamentary application can be traced to Burke. In May 1769 there was a great debate in what is house of commons on what is petition against what is return of Colonel Luttrell for Westminster in what is place of Alderman Wilkes, who had been expelled from what is house by its order. what is king's ministers made great efforts to bring their followers together from all quarters for this debate. Burke, who took part in what is debate, referred to these efforts, and described how ministers had sent for their friends to what is north and to Paris, whipping them in, than which, he said, there could not be a hetter phrase. what is phrase thus adopted and commended by Bmrke caught what is public fancy and soon became popular. In what is Annual Register of 1772 we find a sketch of an imaginary politician of whom it is said where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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