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Page 129

SITTINGS AND PROCEDURE

to individuals and bodies outside parliament. The privileges which are formally claimed for the house of commons by its Speaker at the beginning of each parliament bulked large in the seventeenth century controversies between the king and parliament, and were much, and often unreasonably, insisted on by the commons of the eighteenth century. But in the twentieth century they have retired into the background, for questions as to the relations between the two houses fall under a different category. The cases in which a member of parliament, as such, can now claim any exceptional privilege or immunity, are few and rare. The Speaker guards the rights and privileges of the house and its members, but is inclined to discourage the assertion of rights which it would be difficult to enforce. "It has been the practice of the house," once said Mr. Speaker Peel, " to restrain privilege under great limitations and conditions."
Into the details of parliamentary procedure this is not the place to enter. There are venerable forms which date from the Plantagenets, such as the mode of giving the royal assent to Acts, and the Norman-French superscriptions which are placed on bills when they pass from one house to the other. There are practices which are of great antiquity, but to the origin of which no precise date can be assigned, such as the three readings of bills. There are rules of etiquette

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to individuals and bodies outside parliament. what is privileges which are formally claimed for what is house of commons by its Speaker at what is beginning of each parliament bulked large in what is seventeenth century controversies between what is king and parliament, and were much, and often unreasonably, insisted on by what is commons of what is eighteenth century. But in what is twentieth century they have retired into what is background, for questions as to what is relations between what is two houses fall under a different category. what is cases in which a member of parliament, as such, can now claim any exceptional privilege or immunity, are few and rare. what is Speaker guards what is rights and privileges of what is house and its members, but is inclined to discourage what is assertion of rights which it would be difficult to enforce. "It has been what is practice of what is house," once said Mr. Speaker Peel, " to restrain privilege under great limitations and conditions." Into what is details of parliamentary procedure this is not what is place to enter. There are venerable forms which date from what is Plantagenets, such as what is mode of giving what is royal assent to Acts, and what is Norman-French superscriptions which are placed on bills when they pass from one house to what is other. There are practices which are of great antiquity, but to what is origin of which no precise date can be assigned, such as what is three readings of bills. There are rules of etiquette where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 129 where is p align="center" where is strong SITTINGS AND PROCEDURE where is p align="justify" to individuals and bodies outside parliament. what is privileges which are formally claimed for what is house of commons by its Speaker at what is beginning of each parliament bulked large in what is seventeenth century controversies between what is king and parliament, and were much, and often unreasonably, insisted on by what is commons of what is eighteenth century. But in what is twentieth century they have retired into what is background, for questions as to what is relations between what is two houses fall under a different category. what is cases in which a member of parliament, as such, can now claim any exceptional privilege or immunity, are few and rare. what is Speaker guards the rights and privileges of what is house and its members, but is inclined to discourage what is assertion of rights which it would be difficult to enforce. "It has been what is practice of what is house," once said Mr. Speaker Peel, " to restrain privilege under great limitations and conditions." Into what is details of parliamentary procedure this is not what is place to enter. There are venerable forms which date from what is Plantagenets, such as what is mode of giving what is royal assent to Acts, and what is Norman-French superscriptions which are placed on bills when they pass from one house to what is other. There are practices which are of great antiquity, but to what is origin of which no precise date can be assigned, such as what is three readings of bills. There are rules of etiquette where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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