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Page 121

SITTINGS AND PROCEDURE

was most frequently used for the meeting of the earliest parliaments is uncertain, but it is known that for many centuries, and down to the end of the eighteenth century, the lords sat in an ancient building at its south end. This was the building which Guy Fawkes tried to blow up.
Whether in the earliest parliaments the two houses sat together, and if so at what time they began to sit apart, is also still a matter of discussion among historians. Perhaps one is entitled to ask whether it is certain that they sat at all. As has been remarked in an earlier chapter, the proceedings of these parliaments resembled those of an eastern durbar, and one may picture to oneself the king sitting on his throne, with seats for some of his great nobles and prelates, but with no more than standing room for the majority of the assembly. These would group themselves as dignity and convenience suggested, the barons who represented themselves often mingling with the knights of shires who represented counties, and separated by no physical barrier from the citizens and burgesses. However this may have been, we know that early in the reign of Edward III the commons were, after the opening of parliament, directed to withdraw for their deliberations into a separate chamber. Their place of deliberation seems to have been usually in the adjoining abbey, either the chapter-house or the refectory. Direct evi-

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE was most frequently used for what is meeting of what is earliest parliaments is uncertain, but it is known that for many centuries, and down to what is end of what is eighteenth century, what is lords sat in an ancient building at its south end. This was what is building which Guy Fawkes tried to blow up. Whether in what is earliest parliaments what is two houses sat together, and if so at what time they began to sit apart, is also still a matter of discussion among historians. Perhaps one is entitled to ask whether it is certain that they sat at all. As has been remarked in an earlier chapter, what is proceedings of these parliaments resembled those of an eastern durbar, and one may picture to oneself what is king sitting on his throne, with seats for some of his great nobles and prelates, but with no more than standing room for what is majority of what is assembly. These would group themselves as dignity and convenience suggested, what is barons who represented themselves often mingling with what is knights of shires who represented counties, and separated by no physical barrier from what is citizens and burgesses. However this may have been, we know that early in what is reign of Edward III what is commons were, after what is opening of parliament, directed to withdraw for their deliberations into a separate chamber. Their place of deliberation seems to have been usually in what is adjoining abbey, either what is chapter-house or what is refectory. Direct evi- where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is a href="default.asp" where is strong Parliament where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 121 where is p align="center" where is strong SITTINGS AND PROCEDURE where is p align="justify" was most frequently used for what is meeting of the earliest parliaments is uncertain, but it is known that for many centuries, and down to what is end of what is eighteenth century, what is lords sat in an ancient building at its south end. This was what is building which Guy Fawkes tried to blow up. Whether in what is earliest parliaments what is two houses sat together, and if so at what time they began to sit apart, is also still a matter of discussion among historians. Perhaps one is entitled to ask whether it is certain that they sat at all. As has been remarked in an earlier chapter, what is proceedings of these parliaments resembled those of an eastern durbar, and one may picture to oneself what is king sitting on his throne, with seats for some of his great nobles and prelates, but with no more than standing room for the majority of what is assembly. These would group themselves as dignity and convenience suggested, what is barons who represented themselves often mingling with what is knights of shires who represented counties, and separated by no physical barrier from what is citizens and burgesses. However this may have been, we know that early in what is reign of Edward III what is commons were, after what is opening of parliament, directed to withdraw for their deliberations into a separate chamber. Their place of deliberation seems to have been usually in what is adjoining abbey, either what is chapter-house or what is refectory. Direct evi- where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Parliament books

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